chronic kidney disease

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chronic kidney disease

A condition defined as either:
(1) Kidney damage for = 3 months, defined by structural or functional renal abnormalities with or without a reduced glomerular filtration rate, manifest by either:
• Pathological abnormalities, or
• Markers of kidney damage, including abnormalities in the composition of the blood or urine, or abnormalities in imaging tests;
(2) GFR < 60 mL/min/1.73 m2 for = 3 months, with or without kidney damage.
 
Workup
Serum creatinine for GFR, protein to creatinine ratio, examine urine sediment or dipstick for red cells, WBCs, imaging of kidneys, serum electrolytes (Na+, K+, Cl-, bicarbonate).

chronic kidney disease

,

CKD

Any illness in which kidney function remains diminished for a long period of time. CKD is defined as > 30 mg of urinary albumin excretion per gram of urinary creatinine, or a glomerular filtration rate of < 60mL/min/1.73m2 and includes both end-stage renal disease and improper functioning of kidney transplants. “Renal insufficiency” is a less-preferred term.
References in periodicals archive ?
Despite these complications, advances in medical science and technology, in the form of assisted reproductive techniques (ARTs) have ensured that women with CKD can also conceive and has given a ray of hope to them.
You also may need to monitor your intake of potassium (found in bananas, citrus fruits, potatoes, tomatoes, and nuts), since CKD causes it to accumulate in the blood, and this can harm the heart.
Nevertheless, the work done by these authors is greatly valued, and elements of their work are vital to include when defining uncertainty in individuals with CKD.
Male and female patients of all age groups diagnosed with advanced CKD i.
Your doctor also will measure albumin in your urine, along with the ratio of albumin to creatinine, to help diagnose CKD and gauge its severity.
Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) CKD Work Group.
CRP is also supportive in prognostication and in monitoring treatment in CKD patients, it rose in these patients because CKD is an inflammatory process and pro-inflammatory cytokines are responsible for its increased synthesis.
3) This review provides information from the current literature and the KDIGO (Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes) guidelines, and focuses primarily on the non-dialysis CKD population.
If left untreated, CKD can lead to kidney failure, requiring dialysis or transplantation for survival.
It's possible that plant proteins lower the production of toxins that have been implicated in CKD progression and that also contribute to cardiovascular disease.