CHIMP Act

Chimpanzee Health Improvement, Maintenance, & Protection Act. An act that mandates a national system of sanctuaries for retired research chimps
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After the war he got a job helping a man with a chimp act and eventually got a job with Wilkie's circus, becoming their bear trainer.
The CHIMP Act of 2000 was enthusiastically supported by many national animal-advocacy organizations and by primatologist Jane Goodall, and many animal advocates regard the CHIMP Act as the most significant piece of federal legislation since the 1985 amendments to the federal Animal Welfare Act, (27) itself an extremely modest law.
31) The CHIMP Act was described as "fiscally sound legislation that will better serve the taxpayers as well as the animals.
Moreover, the CHIMP Act was explicitly proposed as a way of ensuring that research involving chimpanzees can continue.
37) Like the supposed improvements in farm-animal welfare discussed in the previous section, the CHIMP Act provides yet another, and a particularly relevant, illustration of a point made continually in my work: Animal-welfare measures, which are regarded as a "cost of doing business," may very well facilitate continued animal exploitation by making it more acceptable.
Although the CHIMP Act purports to prohibit further invasive research on "retired" chimpanzees in the sanctuary system, the Act has two important exceptions.
Animal advocates who supported the CHIMP Act either failed to appreciate that such a sanctuary system controlled by the government would facilitate, and not inhibit, research on "retired" chimpanzees, or they ignored that fact.
Supporters of the CHIMP Act claimed that the exception for invasive research was needed to get support for the bill by the National Institutes of Health (NIH)--and that is precisely the problem.
In the face of concerns expressed by myself and others about the CHIMP Act before its enactment, animal advocates who supported the Act argued that the solution to the problem presented by the exception allowing invasive research was to support the Act and then to challenge in court any determination to use sanctuary chimpanzees in further research.
A research team, led by psychologist Robert Ward of Bangor University, Wales, says that people can usually tell whether or not a chimp acts dominantly and is physically active simply by looking at a picture of the ape's expressionless mug.
No poker face People can tell whether a chimp acts dominantly and is physically active just by looking at a picture of its expressionless mug.
People can usually tell whether a chimp acts dominantly and is physically active just by looking at a picture of the ape's expressionless mug, says a team led by psychologist Robert Ward of Bangor University in Wales.