CFC

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CFC

abbr.
chlorofluorocarbon
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

chlorofluorocarbon

(klōr″ō-floor″ō-kar′bŏn) [ chloro- + fluorocarbon],

CFC

A fluorinated hydrocarbon, formerly used in metered dose inhalers as a propellant gas. CFCs accumulate in and damage the ozone layer of the stratosphere.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
The proposed regulations provide guidance for tracking and calculating the net used tested loss amount of separate CFCs when those CFCs are held through a chain of CFCs.
There were more CFCs in the services sector than any other industrial sector.
75-7, a CFC incorporated in Country X entered into an agreement with a contract manufacturer located in County O to convert metal ore concentrate into a ferroalloy.
Also attending the ceremony were Mexican scientist Mario Molina Henriquez, who won the 1995 Nobel Prize in chemistry for his research on the link between CFCs and the destruction of the ozone layer.
Incorporating science, technology and economics, the Montreal Protocol laid out timetables for every country to phase out production of CFCs. In the U.S., Congress amended the Clean Air Act to comply with treaty goals.
The project, apart from providing financial compensation to CFC producing units will also include a technical assistance program to be implemented by India's Ministry of Environment and Forests.
Brack's warning was apparently heeded in July 1997, when customs agents from the Netherlands, Germany, Belgium, and the United Kingdom teamed up to seize 150 tons of contraband CFCs shipped from China to the port of Rotterdam in intentionally mislabeled canisters.
The World chemical industry reckons that as much as a fifth of the CFCs in use are illegally being traded.
Now that manufacturers in the United States are prohibited from making CFCs, the price has risen to $25a pound.
However, according to industry experts, including mechanical contractors and the providers of refrigerants to building management, CFCs are still in wide use, and continue to be the most common refrigerant being used by centrifugal chillers in New York.
If the "Wise Users" are right, this is a natural process: volcanoes, forest fires, and oceanic evaporation are constantly contributing chlorine to the stratosphere in amounts that dwarf the total inventory of CFCs the entire human race has managed to produce.