CD59


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CD59

a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored membrane protein present on many hemopoietic cells, vascular endothelium, epithelial cells, and placenta that inhibits membrane complement attack and may be involved in T-cell signal transduction; absent or defective in paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria.

CD59

A 65-kD membrane, glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol-anchored complement-neutralising protein encoded by CD59 on chromosome 11p13, which inhibits the complement membrane attack complex, binding to C8 and C9 during assembly of the complex.

Normal expression
Most leukocytes and red cells.

Abnormal expression
May be absent in some forms of paroxysmal nocturnal haemoglobinuria.
References in periodicals archive ?
Targeted deletion of the CD59 gene causes spontaneous intravascular hemolysis and hemoglobinuria.
CD59-positive cells were detected in all samples after 2 h of incubation time with CPZ 50 [micro]M (Figure 8), and there was no statistically significant difference in the proportion of the CD59 between samples and the control RBCs.
CD117-brightly positive cells were then analyzed for expression of CD2, CD25, CD35, CD59, CD63, and CD69 (Figure 2, A through L).
In particular, the expression of CD55 and CD59 (15) that are partially lost by RBCs during in vitro and in vivo aging [16] were measured.
Our own cells contain CD59, a membrane-anchored protein that protects us from complement-mediated damage by preventing assembly of a functional MAC.
HIV is able to incorporate a key protein in that self-protection mechanism, CD59, and by doing so makes itself appear to be one of the body's normal cells, not an infective agent.
CD59, a membrane bound complement regulatory protein prevents MAC formation by inhibiting the incorporation of C9 (8).
The complement regulatory proteins CD46 and CD59, but not CD55, are highly expressed by glandular epithelium of human breast and colorectal tumour tissues.
The effects of marathon running on expression of the complement regulatory proteins CD55 (DAF) and CD59 (MACIF) on red blood cells.
Alternatively, they could migrate to the inner acrosome membrane and be lost after acrosome reaction, such as CD46, CD55 and CD59 [6].
Toronto, Canada), a biotechnology company discovering and developing the next wave of antibody therapeutics, announced that new findings have been presented from its Trop-2 and CD59 antibody programs.