surveillance

(redirected from CCTV)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

surveillance

 [sur-vāl´ans]
1. watching or monitoring.
2. a procedure used instead of quarantine to control the spread of infectious disease, involving close supervision during the incubation period of possible contacts of individuals exposed to an infectious disease.
3. in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as the purposeful and ongoing acquisition, interpretation, and synthesis of patient data for clinical decision-making.
surveillance: community in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as purposeful and ongoing acquisition, interpretation, and synthesis of data for decision-making in the community.
surveillance: late pregnancy in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as the purposeful and ongoing acquisition, interpretation, and synthesis of maternal-fetal data for treatment, observation, or admission. See also pregnancy.
surveillance and/or observation a nursing intervention in the nursing minimum data set; action through which the nurse examines and monitors physical and behavioral responses to disease or injury and to the prescribed medical and/or nursing therapy.
surveillance: remote electronic in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as purposeful and ongoing acquisition of patient data via electronic modalities (telephone, video conferencing, e-mail) from distant locations as well as interpretation and synthesis of patient data for clinical decision-making with individuals or populations. See also telehealth.
surveillance: safety in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as the purposeful and ongoing collection and analysis of information about the patient and the environment for use in promoting and maintaining patient safety.
skin surveillance in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as the collection and analysis of patient data to maintain skin and mucous membrane integrity. See also skin care.
surveillance (omaha) in the omaha system, an intervention on the first level of the intervention scheme, defined as nursing activities of detection, measurement, critical analysis, and monitoring to indicate client status in relation to a given condition or phenomenon.

sur·veil·lance

(sŭr-vā'lănts),
1. The collection, collation, analysis, and dissemination of data; a type of observational study that involves continuous monitoring of disease occurrence within a population.
2. Ongoing scrutiny, generally using methods distinguished by practicability, uniformity, or rapidity, rather than complete accuracy.
[Fr. surveiller, to watch over, fr. L. super- + vigilo, to watch]

surveillance

(1) The ongoing observation of the health of individuals or populations.
(2) The monitoring of diseases that have a known prevalence in a population.
(3) The ongoing systematic collection, analysis, interpretation, and reporting of health data.

surveillance

Epidemiology
1. The monitoring of diseases that have a certain prevalence in a population.
2. The ongoing systematic collection, analysis, interpretation, and reporting of health data. See Epidemiologic surveillance, Fluoride surveillance, Health surveillance, HIV surveillance, Immunosurveillance, Medical surveillance, Public health surveillance, Sentinel surveillance, Site-specific surveillance.

sur·veil·lance

(sŭr-vā'lăns)
1. The collection, collation, analysis, and dissemination of data; a type of observational study that involves continuous monitoring of disease occurrence within a population.
2. Ongoing scrutiny, generally using methods distinguished by practicability, uniformity, and rapidity, rather than complete accuracy.
[Fr. surveiller, to watch over, fr. L. super- + vigilo, to watch]

sur·veil·lance

(sŭr-vā'lăns)
1. Collection, collation, analysis, and dissemination of data.
2. Ongoing scrutiny, generally using methods distinguished by practicability and rapidity, rather than complete accuracy.
[Fr. surveiller, to watch over, fr. L. super- + vigilo, to watch]
References in periodicals archive ?
Besides, CCTVs installed in police lockups are also functioning properly round the clock.
"It is reiterated that the draft rules put out for public suggestions/objections/feedback by the committee formed under the Principal Secretary (Home) have only prescribed a reporting mechanism for CCTVs and not a licensing mechanism," the LG said in a statement.
He said the CCTVs on the island had detected a total of 31,295 traffic obstruction cases, 82 accidents and 107 street light malfunctions while a total of 156 vehicles were clamped and 55 towed away for obstructing traffic based on the monitoring system using the CCTVs.
"However, we would like to see legislation introduced to make CCTV in abattoirs mandatory, and will continue to urge the Welsh Government to act in Wales.
However, most UAE organizations do not currently have the technology infrastructure to support CCTV projects, argues the UAE-based IT infrastructure and information management consultancy and solutions provider Condo Protego.
Midlothian and Inverclyde are the first councils proposing the move, with their officials recommending the switch-off or rundown of their entire council CCTV systems.
'The use of CCTV footage has become a game-changer in our pursuit of justice for victims of crimes.
According to recently published report of Bonafide Research "India CCTV Camera Market Outlook, 2021", CCTV camera, access control system, intrusion detection system and intercom are some of the products that are used in the electronic security market.
CCTV-4 HD, CGTN HD (formerly CCTV News) and CGTN-Documentary HD (formerly CCTV Documentary) are now available in High Definition in Chinese and English from the high-power HOTBIRD satellites.
Premises under CCTV supervision would be "clearly marked", the operator stated, adding "the footage is under strict supervision and vigilance".
Taking another technological step from the camera traps now being widely used, Young describes how to use closed-circuit television (CCTV) to monitor wildlife.