CAS

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CAS

Abbreviation for:
calcified aortic stenosis
Canadian AIDS Society
Canadian Andropause Society
Canadian Anesthesiologists’ Society
Cancer Attitude Survey
carbonic anhydrase
carcinomas
cardiac adjustment scale
Care Assessment Schedule (Medspeak-UK)
carotid angioplasty and stenting
carotid artery stenosis
carotid artery stenting
castrated
Central Alerting System, see there (Medspeak-UK)
central anticholinergic syndrome
central auditory system
Chemical Abstract Service (Medspeak-UK)
clinical asthma score
Cognitive Assessment Scale
cold agglutinin syndrome
Community Accountancy Service (Medspeak-UK)
congenital alcohol syndrome
continuous androgen supression
Controls Assurance Statement (Medspeak-UK)
coronary artery spasm
coronary artery stenosis
coronary atherosclerosis
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

CAS

Abbreviation for Chemical Abstracts Service.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The view of the ETI is that CCS is the best way to soften the bumpy landing the world faces when it comes to energy resources.
Advocates of CCS say that much of the technology to sequester carbon where it's produced already exists and merely needs to be trialled and refined to bring about long-term cost reductions.
CCS can do more than simply siphon off carbon and lock it away.
China is one of the few countries to unequivocally embrace CCS. Given that the world's most populous nation is building power plants at a ferocious rate 363 are currently being planned, according to the WRI--this may turn out to be the global showcase that the industry so desperately wants.
More widely, the major stumbling block for CCS is that of cost.
Supporters feel that CCS hasn't enjoyed a level playing field, having been denied the initial financial support given to many other energy technologies.
'Today, oil companies can drill and make a profit from one million barrels--40 years ago, BP was looking at seeking 200 million barrels and still nearly being killed oft' Sweeney agrees, noting that 'other technologies had these benefits in their first growth phase', while Brad Page, director of the Global CCS Institute, points out that 'there isn't a zero-or low-emission project today that isn't surviving without government support'.
Page meanwhile argues that CCS needs to be deployed appropriately and judiciously.
Perhaps more than with any other potential climate change mitigation policy, it's tricky to unpick exactly what role CCS will play in the future.
Gluyas also feels that CCS will ultimately be vindicated.
Because of the complexity of CCS, governments must show patience and stick with it for the long haul, Sweeney suggests.
Governments aren't looking at CCS from the perspective of 'we are going to use electricity for transport and heating and provide the majority of electricity from renewable sources and only use CCS for cement and steel--those things we can't electrify.