CCR5

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CCR5

A gene on chromosome 3p21.31 that encodes a member of the beta chemokine receptor family, which is similar to G protein-coupled receptors. CCR5 is expressed by T cells and macrophages; it is a receptor for various CC-chemokines, including MIP-1-alpha, MIP-1-beta and RANTES, and transduces a signal by increasing the intracellular calcium ion level. CCR5 may play a role in the control of granulocytic lineage proliferation or differentiation, and is an important co-receptor for macrophage-tropic viruses (e.g., HIV-1) entering host cells.

CCR5

A chemokine receptor; defects in its structure caused by genetic mutation cause the progression of AIDS to be prevented or slowed.
Mentioned in: AIDS
References in periodicals archive ?
In their study, Wu and colleagues used an anti-HIV drug called Maraviroc to bind an engineered CCR5 receptor and then purified and crystallized the resulting complex at a very high resolution.
That research suggests that the connection might be through the CCR5 receptor, the major coreceptor of HIV on CD4 cells.
SCH D: Antiviral activity of a CCR5 receptor antagonist.
Usually, the virus goes for the so-called CCR5 receptor, but some HIV strains latch onto CXCR4.
The team showed that oncogenes turn on the CCR5 receptor in normal breast cells as they became transformed into cancer cells.
That research has suggested that the connection might be through the CCR5 receptor, the major coreceptor of HIV on CD4 cells.
Rockville, MD) announced that Human Genome Sciences has acquired an exclusive worldwide license from Abgenix to develop and commercialize a fully human monoclonal antibody to the CCR5 receptor.
But the beta Chemokines only block some HIV viruses, those that use the CCR5 receptor on the CD4 cell to enter the cell--not viruses that use the CXCR4 receptor, which often evolve later in HIV infection.
Multiple copies of this so-called CCR5 receptor sit on the surface of each CD4 T cell.
A polymorphism in the CCR5 receptor gene, in particular, has prompted a great deal of research.
professor and chief of the Division of Infectious Diseases and HIV Medicine at Drexel University College of Medicine, to conduct additional Phase II studies with PRO 140, an experimental humanized monoclonal antibody (mAb) targeting the CCR5 receptor for the treatment of HIV infection.
Individuals who naturally lack the CCR5 receptor have been found to be essentially resistant to HIV.