CCR5

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CCR5

A gene on chromosome 3p21.31 that encodes a member of the beta chemokine receptor family, which is similar to G protein-coupled receptors. CCR5 is expressed by T cells and macrophages; it is a receptor for various CC-chemokines, including MIP-1-alpha, MIP-1-beta and RANTES, and transduces a signal by increasing the intracellular calcium ion level. CCR5 may play a role in the control of granulocytic lineage proliferation or differentiation, and is an important co-receptor for macrophage-tropic viruses (e.g., HIV-1) entering host cells.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

CCR5

A chemokine receptor; defects in its structure caused by genetic mutation cause the progression of AIDS to be prevented or slowed.
Mentioned in: AIDS
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
CytoDyn is a biotechnology company developing innovative treatments for multiple therapeutic indications based on leronlimab, a novel humanized monoclonal antibody targeting the CCR5 receptor. CCR5 appears to play a key role in the ability of HIV to enter and infect healthy T-cells.
The patient's immune cells remain unable to express the CCR5 receptor.
In their study, Wu and colleagues used an anti-HIV drug called Maraviroc to bind an engineered CCR5 receptor and then purified and crystallized the resulting complex at a very high resolution.
The patent is entitled Ribozymes Capable of Inhibiting the Expression of the CCR5 Receptor (SN: 2000-535739).
Maraviroc (Pfizer) is the first CCR5 receptor antagonist, licensed for the treatment of HIV infection.
This new class of HIV drugs blocks HIV from attaching onto the CCR5 receptor on the T-cell, making it hard for the virus to enter T cells.
Other HGS drugs in clinical development include two TRAIL receptor antibodies for the treatment of hematologic and solid malignancies, in addition to an antibody to the CCR5 receptor for the treatment of HIV/AIDS.
Notably, genetic analysis has shown that these individuals tend to have polymorphisms within the CCR gene promotor region that are associated with low expression of the CCR5 receptor, which is used by HIV to enter the cell.
That research suggests that the connection might be through the CCR5 receptor, the major coreceptor of HIV on CD4 cells.
SCH D: Antiviral activity of a CCR5 receptor antagonist.
Usually, the virus goes for the so-called CCR5 receptor, but some HIV strains latch onto CXCR4.