CCR5 coreceptor

CCR5 coreceptor

A cell surface receptor found on macrophages that facilitates entry of HIV-1 into these cells. Chemokines released by T cells attempt to compete with HIV by blocking the receptor to prevent infection.
See also: coreceptor
References in periodicals archive ?
In conclusion, our study documented for the first time a strong predictive association, independent from other available markers, that a high FPR, predicting a CCR5 coreceptor usage, is protective in children and is related to a better immunological (CD4 level) and clinical outcome.
HIV-1 escape to CCR5 coreceptor antagonism through selection of CXCR4-using variants in vitro.
Also, after work on polyanions began, research showed that viruses using the CCR5 coreceptor are preferentially transmitted, and polyanions had even lower potency against those R5 viruses.
A CCR5 coreceptor antagonist approved for use in combination with other antiretroviral drugs for treating adults infected with only CCR5-tropic HIV-1 and who have evidence of viral replication and HIV-1 strains resistant to multiple antiretroviral agents.
A CCR5 coreceptor antagonist approved for use in combination with other anti-retroviral drugs for treating adults infected with only CCR5-tropic HIV-1 and who have evidence of viral replication and HIV-1 strains resistant to multiple anti-retroviral agents.
s maraviroc, is an antagonist to the CCR5 coreceptor used by HIV to enter CD4-positive T cells.
Although the CCR5 coreceptor is required for chemokine signaling, individuals lacking the CCR5 alleles appear to have normal immune responses (56,57).
This drug blocks viral interaction with the CCR5 coreceptor on the cell.
Unlike currently approved therapies, PRO 140 blocks the CCR5 coreceptor, one of the principal portals HIV uses to enter cells.
Initiated a phase 1 clinical trial of a new HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) therapy, PRO 140, a humanized monoclonal antibody against the CCR5 coreceptor that is designed to block infection by inhibiting the ability of the virus to enter healthy cells.
Factors such as the local inflammatory response caused by bacterial vaginosis, urethritis, and sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) have been associated with upregulation of CCR5 coreceptor expression and increased activation of T lymphocytes in the mucosa of women, thus leading to increased susceptibility.
Unlike currently approved therapies, PRO 140 blocks the CCR5 coreceptor, one of the principal portals HIV uses to enter cells, that was discovered in 1996 by Progenics' scientists and their collaborators.