charge-coupled device

(redirected from CCD imaging)
Also found in: Dictionary, Encyclopedia.

charge-coupled device

Abbreviation: CCD
A device used in video and digital imaging (such as in CT scanning) that creates electronic images from light.
See also: device
References in periodicals archive ?
The protein sample preparation technology gained from an OEM agreement with AbiMed, the bioinformatics software licensed from Computational Biosciences, and the CCD imaging technology from the acquisition of a BioPhotoincs' business are all also potential components of GSI's proteomics solutions.
Its 11 chapters are lavishly illustrated, often in color, and they cover a wide range of techniques, from basic imaging with digicams, webcams, and digital SLRs to advanced high-resolution CCD imaging, spectroscopy, and supernova patrolling.
That's because deep-sky CCD imaging (unlike that with film) can be done successfully by stacking multiple short exposures of, say, 5 minutes each, which is hardly enough time for field rotation to become noticeable (except near the zenith).
During the six years of our efforts, from 1996 to 2002, digital technology evolved very rapidly, and eventually the time came for my wife, Wendee, and I to make the switch from film to CCD imaging. So in June 2003 we loaded the last sheet of hypersensitized Kodak Tech Pan 4415 film into the Celestron Schmidt and took an 8-minute exposure.
Astrodon, manufacturer of filters for CCD imaging, makes a foray further into the optical path with the release of The Rogue ($1,650), a remote-controllable rotating off-axis guider.
The first half of the book is an introduction to technology-assisted astronomy hardware, discussing subjects related to telescopes, including optics, computer-controlled telescopes, and sensor technologies like low-light video, web-cams, full-blown CCD imaging, and related software.
Why do people doing CCD imaging often stack, say, five 1-minute exposures instead of taking just one 5-minute exposure?
If you're wondering why McNeil didn't spot the new nebula before, there are two reasons: First, he set aside his eyepieces about two years ago to dabble in the growing field of CCD imaging (S&T: April 2004, page 78).
(She brought along her observing assistant--that was me, her husband.) Adam Block, one of the AOP's guides and telescope operators, walked her through the basics of CCD imaging. As operator, Block was responsible for aiming, focusing, and tracking the telescope at the objects that Wendee wanted to photograph and for processing the images.
Al Kelly, Richard Berry, Chuck Shaw, and I wrote about the basic techniques for LRGB and WCMY imaging in our article, "TrueColor CCD Imaging" (S&T: December 1998, page 142); you can also read about it on Kelly's Web site at www.ghgcorp .com/akelly/artdraf7.htm.
Although still relatively few amateur astronomers are using CCDs right now compared to film, the dramatic increase in the number of camera accessories, books, software, observing projects, meetings, and Web sites devoted to CCD imaging clearly shows that interest in this new observing field is growing exponentially each year.
This advice applies to all CCD imaging and is especially important for H[alpha] because of the small amount of signal passing through the narrowband filter.