CCR5

(redirected from CC-CKR-5)
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CCR5

A gene on chromosome 3p21.31 that encodes a member of the beta chemokine receptor family, which is similar to G protein-coupled receptors. CCR5 is expressed by T cells and macrophages; it is a receptor for various CC-chemokines, including MIP-1-alpha, MIP-1-beta and RANTES, and transduces a signal by increasing the intracellular calcium ion level. CCR5 may play a role in the control of granulocytic lineage proliferation or differentiation, and is an important co-receptor for macrophage-tropic viruses (e.g., HIV-1) entering host cells.

CCR5

A chemokine receptor; defects in its structure caused by genetic mutation cause the progression of AIDS to be prevented or slowed.
Mentioned in: AIDS
References in periodicals archive ?
People normally have two copies of the gene, but investigators have found that about 1 percent of the white population has a large deletion, or missing DNA segment, in both of their CC-CKR-5 genes.
and his colleagues have found that those with the deletion in only one CC-CKR-5 gene enjoy no protection from HIV infection.
O'Brien notes that about 20 percent of white people appear to harbor the deletion in at least one CC-CKR-5 gene.
In collaboration with investigators at the Aaron Diamond AIDS Research Center in New York City, they also demonstrated that the chemokine receptor CC-CKR-5 is a fusion accessory or second receptor for clinical isolates of HIV.
In test-tube studies, chemokines that bind to CC-CKR-5 seem to prevent some HIV strains from infecting cells.
6584) reporting the discovery that the Beta-chemokine receptor CC-CKR-5 is a second receptor for HIV infection.
In the Nature article, titled "HIV-1 Entry into CD4+ Cells is Mediated by the Chemokine Receptor CC-CKR-5," Progenics and ADARC scientists show for the first time that the Beta-chemokine receptor CC-CKR-5 is a second receptor for primary or clinical strains of the virus.
The defects occur in a gene for an immune cell protein known as CC-CKR-5.
The discovery also strengthens the hypothesis that drugs which interfere with the interaction between HIV and CC-CKR-5 can safely slow the spread of the virus in infected individuals.
Now, in a discovery that offers an explanation for why some people exposed to the virus remain uninfected, several research groups report that the HIV most commonly found in people actually infects via CC-CKR-5, a different protein on the surface of immune cells.
The HIV that requires CC-CKR-5 "is the kind of virus transmitted during sex.