CCR5

(redirected from CC-CKR-5)
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CCR5

A gene on chromosome 3p21.31 that encodes a member of the beta chemokine receptor family, which is similar to G protein-coupled receptors. CCR5 is expressed by T cells and macrophages; it is a receptor for various CC-chemokines, including MIP-1-alpha, MIP-1-beta and RANTES, and transduces a signal by increasing the intracellular calcium ion level. CCR5 may play a role in the control of granulocytic lineage proliferation or differentiation, and is an important co-receptor for macrophage-tropic viruses (e.g., HIV-1) entering host cells.

CCR5

A chemokine receptor; defects in its structure caused by genetic mutation cause the progression of AIDS to be prevented or slowed.
Mentioned in: AIDS
References in periodicals archive ?
The two people have a mutation in each of their two copies of the CC-CKR-5 gene, the researchers report in the Aug.
A research group headed by Marc Parmentier of the Free University of Brussels found the same CC-CKR-5 gene mutation when they screened 704 white people from France and Belgium.
Researchers are increasingly excited about preventing or treating many HIV infections with compounds that bind to CC-CKR-5 and thus stop the virus from using the protein to infect cells.
Like fusin, CC-CKR-5 is a receptor, a protein that normally binds to extracellular molecules and transmits signals into the cell.
As it turns out, CC-CKR-5 is the receptor for RANTES, MIP1-alpha, and MIP1-beta, chemokines already attracting the attention of AIDS investigators.
Taken together, these results suggest that the binding of chemokines to CC-CKR-5 can sometimes prevent HIV from infecting a person, investigators contend.
At least three different research groups have recently linked HIV's ability to infect immune cells to CC-CKR-5.
The third report on CC-CKR-5, scheduled to appear in the June 28 Science, results from a collaboration headed by Philip M.