CNR1

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CNR1

A gene on chromosome 6q14-q15 that encodes one of two cannabinoid receptors, which belong to the G protein-coupled receptor family. CNR1 inhibits adenylate cyclase activity in a dose-dependent, stereoselective and pertussis toxin-sensitive manner, and is responsible for cannabinoid-induced CNS effects (e.g., effects on mood and cognition) of marijuana. CNR1 is also a less preferred gene symbol for what is now designated as PCDHA4, see there.
References in periodicals archive ?
For CB1, both [SmBiT-[beta]arr2.sub.TR382] and [SmBiT-[beta]arr2.sub.TR366] yielded higher signals, the signal for [SmBiT-[beta]arr2.sub.TR366] being significantly higher than for wild-type /[beta]arr2 (P = 0.0034, unpaired student's t test, file S2 in the online Data Supplement).
The majority of the studies (21 studies) on cannabinoids and CINP in animal models evaluated the effects of agonists via CB1 and CB2 receptors (Table 3).
Project CBD research has shown that CBD counteracts the psychoactive effects of THC by inhibiting its effects on CB1 receptors.
The best fitting value for the critical concentration of the ternary composites with CB1, CB2, and CNT were [[phi].sub.c] = 0.58 vol%, 0.20 vol%, and 0.17 vol% which are more than 8 times lower than [[phi].sub.c] = 5.0 vol%, 2.0 vol%, and 1.5 vol% for the single phase systems, respectively.
More recently, CB1 was shown to be densely cumulated within the frontal-limbic brain circuits that are key in both the affective and emotional manifestations of human pain.
In 1988, Howlett's group (Devane et al., 1988) suggested the existence of a specific receptor for cannabinoids known as "cannabinoid receptor 1" or CB1, which is mainly distributed throughout the central nervous system (Burns et al., 2007; Egertova, Giang, Cravatt & Elphick, 1998; van Laere et al., 2008).
The two known cannabinoid receptors are CB1 and CB2.
Endocannabinoids exert important pharmacological and physiological actions by activating CB1 (brain type receptors) and CB2 (spleen type) receptors in mammals.