crassulacean acid metabolism

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crassulacean acid metabolism

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crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM)

a method of PHOTOSYNTHESIS found in certain succulent plants (members of the family Crassulaceae) that live in hot, dry climates and close their stomata during the day to avoid excessive TRANSPIRATION losses and open them at night. During the night CO2 is taken in and stored as organic acids (e.g. malic acid); during the day the CO2 is released from the organic acids and used in the CALVIN CYCLE.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
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Visel, "De novo transcriptome assembly of drought tolerant CAM plants, Agave deserti and Agave tequilana," BMC Genomics, vol.
Unlike normal C3 and C4 plants, CAM plants open their stomata at night, when the relative humidity is higher and transpiration losses are lower.
[73] Ratajczak, R., Kemna, I., und Luettge, U., 1994, "Characteristics, partial purification and reconstitution of the vacuolar malate transporter of the CAM plant Kalanchoe daigremontiana Hamet et Perrier de la Bathie," Planta, 195, pp.
Most CAM plants are tropical succulents belonging to families such as the Agavaceae, Bromeliaceae, Cactaceae, and Euphorbiaceae, although a single family may contain both CAM and [C.sub.4] plants.
In the shade, CAM plants operate in phase III over much of the day (Borland and Griffiths 1996, Skillman and Winter 1997).
Aquatic species in five genera stand out as having acid accumulation that is substantially higher than others and within the range of terrestrial CAM plants. These include the sporebearing Isoetes (Lycophyta: Isoetaceae) and flowering plants (Anthophyta), both monocots, Sagittaria (Alismataceae) and Vallisneria (Hydrocharitaceae), and dicots, Crassula (Crassulaceae), and Littorella (Plantaginaceae).
The lowest response to higher CO2 levels is usually from the CAM plants, which include pineapples, agaves, and many cacti and other succulents.
In contrast to the potential response of [C.sub.4] and [C.sub.3] plants, CAM plants show little response to increasing C[O.sub.2].