crassulacean acid metabolism

(redirected from CAM plants)
Also found in: Dictionary, Encyclopedia.

crassulacean acid metabolism

light) the animal is less conspicuous than if evenly coloured all over.

crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM)

a method of PHOTOSYNTHESIS found in certain succulent plants (members of the family Crassulaceae) that live in hot, dry climates and close their stomata during the day to avoid excessive TRANSPIRATION losses and open them at night. During the night CO2 is taken in and stored as organic acids (e.g. malic acid); during the day the CO2 is released from the organic acids and used in the CALVIN CYCLE.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Although such plants do still use the Calvin cycle of normal C3 plants, their additional enzymes cause them to be classified as C4 or CAM plants.
2]/hr) CAM Plants grow in arid Agave Americana 1 to 4 regions and have stomata open (century plant) at night and closed during the day to conserve water.
CAM plants use water much more efficiently than [C.
CAM plants are thus often restricted to the coastal regions of deserts, where the climate is milder due to the influence of the sea.
3] species, this CAM plant is more drought tolerant and is able to make greater use of transient increases in light for carbon gain ([ILLUSTRATION FOR FIGURE 3 OMITTED], Table 4).
Growth and photosynthesis of Aechmea magdalenae, a terrestrial CAM plant in a moist tropical forest, Panama.
For comparison, terrestrial CAM plants commonly have [Delta][H.
Aquatic species in five genera stand out as having acid accumulation that is substantially higher than others and within the range of terrestrial CAM plants.
2) is the largest genus of aquatic CAM plants, with all 38 aquatic species tested showing substantial [Delta][H.
However, PEPC activities are substantially lower for aquatic CAM species than for terrestrial CAM plants (Dittrich et al.
In aquatic CAM plants there is no obvious selective advantage to rapid dark fixation, whereas in terrestrial species higher PEPC activity may translate into a shorter duration of stomatal opening, and thus higher water use efficiency.
Kinetic studies show many similarities between the PEPC from the aquatic CAM Littorella and terrestrial CAM plants (Groenhof et al.