crassulacean acid metabolism

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crassulacean acid metabolism

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crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM)

a method of PHOTOSYNTHESIS found in certain succulent plants (members of the family Crassulaceae) that live in hot, dry climates and close their stomata during the day to avoid excessive TRANSPIRATION losses and open them at night. During the night CO2 is taken in and stored as organic acids (e.g. malic acid); during the day the CO2 is released from the organic acids and used in the CALVIN CYCLE.
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Although such plants do still use the Calvin cycle of normal C3 plants, their additional enzymes cause them to be classified as C4 or CAM plants.
2]/hr) CAM Plants grow in arid Agave Americana 1 to 4 regions and have stomata open (century plant) at night and closed during the day to conserve water.
Growth and photosynthesis of Aechmea magdalenae, a terrestrial CAM plant in a moist tropical forest, Panama.
For understory CAM plants, maximum carbon gain can be achieved if the sunflecks coincide with phase III (the daytime decarboxylation portion of the daily CAM cycle) because the photosynthetic apparatus is C[O.
In the shade, CAM plants operate in phase III over much of the day (Borland and Griffiths 1996, Skillman and Winter 1997).
Although enhanced water use efficiency is the ultimate selective force in terrestrial CAM plant evolution, the proximal selective factor is enhanced daytime intercellular [CO.
In Osmond's prototype CAM plant, Phase 2 is characterized by a rapid suppression of [CO.
Phase 3 in this aquatic CAM plant is controlled by the depletion of ambient [CO.
Phase 4 is missing in this aquatic CAM plant because ambient [CO.
Most CAM plants are tropical succulents belonging to families such as the Agavaceae, Bromeliaceae, Cactaceae, and Euphorbiaceae, although a single family may contain both CAM and [C.
CAM plants use water much more efficiently than [C.
CAM plants are thus often restricted to the coastal regions of deserts, where the climate is milder due to the influence of the sea.