calcar

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calcar

 [kal´kar]
1. spur.
2. a spur-shaped structure.
calcar a´vis an eminence on the medial wall of the occipital horn of the lateral ventricle, below the bulb of the occipital horn, produced by lateral extension of the calcarine sulcus.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

cal·car

(kal'kar), [TA]
1. A small projection from any structure; internal spurs (septa) at the level of division of arteries and confluence of veins when branches or roots form an acute angle.
See also: vascular spur.
2. A dull spine or projection from a bone.
Synonym(s): spur [TA]
[L. spur, cock's spur]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

calcar

(kăl′kär′)
n. pl. calcaria (kăl-kâr′ē-ə)
A spur or spurlike projection, such as one found on the base of a petal or on the wing or leg of a bird.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

cal·car

(kal'kahr) [TA]
1. A small projection from any structure; internal spurs (septa) at the level of division of arteries and confluence of veins when branches or roots form an acute angle.
2. A spine or projection from a bone.
Synonym(s): spur.
[L. spur, rooster's spur]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

calcar

A spur or spur-like projection from a bone or tendon.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

cal·car

(kal'kahr) [TA]
Dull spine or projection from a bone.
[L. spur, rooster's spur]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
CAULK: Etymology: Middle English caulken, from Old North French cauquer to trample, from Latin calcare, from calc-, calx heel
Bloch and von Wartburg trace first half of the word back through old French and Picard to the Latin "calcare," which means, not coincidentally, to press or to crush.
Lo stile di Camilleri e tardo-moderno: il fatto di calcare la mano sulla riflessivita dei soggetto su se stesso fa parte di questo periodo storico, cosi come ricorrere ad autocitazioni.
This oolitic unit (named improperly, for its composition, as "Calcare di Praso") can be recognized in many parts of the investigated area and can be followed and also locally mapped to the eastern side of the Rendena Valley, in western Trentino.