Clostridium difficile

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Clos·trid·i·um dif·fi·cile

Avoid the mispronunciation dĭf-ĭ-sēl' of this Latin word, which is correctly pronounced dĭ-fĭs'ĭ-lē.
a bacterial species found in feces of humans and animals. It colonizes newborn infants, who are spared from toxin-induced diarrheal disease. Pathogenic for human beings, guinea pigs, and rabbits; frequent cause of colitis and diarrhea following antibiotic use. Found to be a cause of pseudomembranous colitis and associated with a number of intestinal diseases that are linked to antibiotic therapy; also the chief cause of nosocomial diarrhea.
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Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

Clostridium difficile

(dĭf′ĭ-sēl′, dĭf′ĭ-sēl′, dĭf′ĭ-kē′lā)
n.
A bacterium that causes an infectious form of severe diarrhea especially in elderly people on antibiotic therapy and in hospitalized patients. Also called C. diff..
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

Clostridium difficile

A common cause of bacterial colitis; it is the causative agent in 99% of pseudomembranous colitis, and 20-30% of antibiotic-associated diarrhea
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Clos·trid·i·um dif·fi·ci·le

(klos-trid'ē-ŭm di-fis'i-lē)
Gram-positive obligate anaerobic or microaerophilic, rod-shaped bacterium; causes sometimes severe antibiotic-associated colitis.
Synonym(s): C-Diff, CDT.
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Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

Clostridium difficile

A fecal organism endemic in hospitals and responsible for the majority of hospital-acquired cases of diarrhoea in elderly patients. Its prevalence in hospital is largely due to the high levels of antibiotic usage. Bowel infection can be cleared by oral treatment with the antibiotic vancomycin which is not appreciably absorbed into the bloodstream. Up to 40 percent of hospitalized patients are colonized with this organism. Only about 3 percent of healthy adults carry it. A previously uncommon strain with variations in toxin genes has emerged as a cause of C. difficile -associated disease.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
The bug Clostridium difficile (C.diff) contributes to almost 2,000 deaths every year in the UK, mostly in hospitals and care homes.
diff causes severe diarrhoea, cramps and sometimes life-threatening complications, and has traditionally been thought to be transmitted within hospitals from other sick C.diff patients.
Ms Smith said: "There were no cases of hospital acquired MRSA during last year at all, however, we didn't achieve our target on C.Diff last year with 68 cases reported againsta a target of 59.
"It means that 15 in every 100 patients who get C.diff would be saved from any relapse.
The next set of C.diff figures for Josephine Bates and Eileen Feenan both died after contracting C.diff while being cared for by Cardiff and Vale NHS Trust - one of Wales' busiest hospital trusts.
The mortality rate nationally among C.diff victims is seven per cent.
Cases of c.diff decreased from 647 last quarter to 467 April-June 2007.
MicroPharm Ltd, based in Carmarthenshire, has been working for the past five years to develop a systemic form of immunotherapy for use in patients with C.diff.
C.diff has been blamed for almost 20,000 deaths in the last decade and claimed the lives of 2,704 hospital patients in 2010.
Infections with the bacterium known as Clostridium difficile (C.diff) typically have occurred in hospitals and long-term-care facilities.
One expert claims the death toll from Clostridium Difficile (c.diff) could be almost double the official tally.
Three OAPs aged 85, 89 and 91 died as a direct result of C.diff at Eastbourne District General Hospital, East Sussex.