Campylobacter jejuni

(redirected from C. jejuni)

Cam·py·lo·bac·ter je·ju·ni

a thermophilic bacterial species that causes an acute gastroenteritis of sudden onset with constitutional symptoms (malaise, myalgia, arthralgia, and headache) and cramping abdominal pain in humans; it has been associated with a demyelinating sequela, which can present with ascending paralysis. Potential sources of human infection include poultry, cattle, sheep, pigs, and dogs. This species also causes abortion in sheep.

Campylobacter jejuni

Vibrio jejuni, Campylobacter fetus ssp jejuni A curved or spiral gram-negative bacillus with a single polar flagellum Epidemiology Linked to contact with domestic and farm animals, unpasteurized milk, primates, day care centers; peaks in summer Clinical Acute gastroenteritis of abrupt onset; malaise, myalgia, headache; Sx may be accompanied by abdominal colic, N&V, anorexia, tenesmus Management Erythromycin, tetracycline, gentamicin, furazolidine, chloramphenicol

Cam·py·lo·bac·ter je·ju·ni

(kam'pi-lō-bak'tĕr je-jū'nī)
A bacterial species that causes an acute gastroenteritis of sudden onset with constitutional symptoms (malaise, myalgia, arthralgia, and headache) and cramping abdominal pain; potential sources of human infection include poultry, cattle, sheep, pigs, and dogs. Pathogen is the most frequent cause of campylobacteriosis.

Campylobacter jejuni

The commonest cause of bacterial food poisoning in Britain. See CAMPYLOBACTER ENTERITIS.
References in periodicals archive ?
Campylobacter jejuni (C. jejuni) is known to be the most common cause of bacterial gastroenteritis in developed countries.
In the United States, most of the reported Campylobacter infections are caused by Campylobacter jejuni (C. jejuni) [9].
Human exposure to C. jejuni occurs through various routes, including foodborne and waterborne transmission and direct contact with farm and companion animals (2).
Outbreaks of C. jejuni were reported worldwide with chicken meats identified as implicated foods [2,3].
After Campylobacter jejuni was cultured from stool specimens submitted by three ill members of the dining party, a confirmed case was defined as culture evidence of C. jejuni infection in any restaurant guest or staff member with onset of diarrheal illness during the same period.
Bacterial culture procedures for manure and Andersen impactor samples were conducted to quantify gram-negative bacteria, Salmonella spp., C. jejuni, commensal E.
Yapilan calismalarda gelismis ulkelerde Campylobacter spp.'nin neden oldugu gastroenteritlerin %90'indan C. jejuni, %5-10'undan da C.
Six different formed human stool samples were obtained from our outpatient laboratory as matrices for spiking with C. jejuni or E.
coli clinical isolate kindly provided by the Instituto Nacional de Salud from Lima (Peru) and C. jejuni ATCC 33560, Escherichia coli ATCC 25922, and Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923 were used as control.
Campylobacter is a key zoonotic pathogen which causes food-borne enteritis with C. jejuni and C.
As a zoonotic enteric pathogen, C. jejuni is a Gram-negative, non-spore forming, micraerophilic organism that can inhabit in the intestinal tracts of wide range of domestic animals counting poultry, cattle and swine as well as wild birds and animals (3).