Clostridium difficile

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Clos·trid·i·um dif·fi·cile

Avoid the mispronunciation dĭf-ĭ-sēl' of this Latin word, which is correctly pronounced dĭ-fĭs'ĭ-lē.
a bacterial species found in feces of humans and animals. It colonizes newborn infants, who are spared from toxin-induced diarrheal disease. Pathogenic for human beings, guinea pigs, and rabbits; frequent cause of colitis and diarrhea following antibiotic use. Found to be a cause of pseudomembranous colitis and associated with a number of intestinal diseases that are linked to antibiotic therapy; also the chief cause of nosocomial diarrhea.
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Clostridium difficile

(dĭf′ĭ-sēl′, dĭf′ĭ-sēl′, dĭf′ĭ-kē′lā)
n.
A bacterium that causes an infectious form of severe diarrhea especially in elderly people on antibiotic therapy and in hospitalized patients. Also called C. diff..

Clostridium difficile

A common cause of bacterial colitis; it is the causative agent in 99% of pseudomembranous colitis, and 20-30% of antibiotic-associated diarrhea

Clos·trid·i·um dif·fi·ci·le

(klos-trid'ē-ŭm di-fis'i-lē)
Gram-positive obligate anaerobic or microaerophilic, rod-shaped bacterium; causes sometimes severe antibiotic-associated colitis.
Synonym(s): C-Diff, CDT.
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Clostridium difficile

A fecal organism endemic in hospitals and responsible for the majority of hospital-acquired cases of diarrhoea in elderly patients. Its prevalence in hospital is largely due to the high levels of antibiotic usage. Bowel infection can be cleared by oral treatment with the antibiotic vancomycin which is not appreciably absorbed into the bloodstream. Up to 40 percent of hospitalized patients are colonized with this organism. Only about 3 percent of healthy adults carry it. A previously uncommon strain with variations in toxin genes has emerged as a cause of C. difficile -associated disease.
References in periodicals archive ?
C. difficile bacteria can infect the gut and are the leading cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhoea worldwide.
To demonstrate this evolution of C. difficile, LSHTM helped devise the study, select strains for analysis and interpret the genome data.
En el estudio, los investigadores aplicaron esporas de la C. difficile en agua esterilizada a batas quirurgicas durante distintas duraciones: 10 segundos, 30 segundos, 1 minuto, 5 minutos y 10 minutos.
case in which hospital gowns contaminated with the deadly 027 strain of C. difficile were suspected of transmitting the bacteria.
The supernatant was then discarded, resuspended with 1 ml of PBS and the remainder transferred to the Elution reagent from the GeneXpert Kit and then this solution was transferred to the GeneXpert cartridge (Xpert[R] C. difficile test, Cepheid, Sunnyvale, CA).
* C. difficile can be found in healthy infants at levels that would cause pseudomembranous colitis (the severe stage of CDI) in elderly adult patients; we still do not understand the mechanism of this protection in infants.
Real-time PCR was used for detecting the C.difficile gene encoding toxin B directly from stool samples using the Xpert C. difficile assay (Cepheid, USA).
The mean rate of hospital-onset C. difficile infection for the community hospitals, multi specialty centers, and cancer centers was 0.57, 0.88, and 1.57 cases per 1,000 patient-days (p = 0.0007).
Transmission of C. difficile occurs primarily in healthcare facilities, where exposure to antimicrobial drugs and environmental contamination by its spores are causing mostly nosocomial infection [10,11].
Almost 60% of the patients with unexplained leukocytosis (35 of 60) had a positive C. difficile toxin, compared with 12% of the controls (P less than .001).
The ARIES C. difficile Assay is a real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based qualitative in vitro diagnostic test that detects both toxin A and toxin B, which may reduce the probability of a false negative result from strains that only produce toxin A.