Clostridium difficile

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Clos·trid·i·um dif·fi·cile

Avoid the mispronunciation dĭf-ĭ-sēl' of this Latin word, which is correctly pronounced dĭ-fĭs'ĭ-lē.
a bacterial species found in feces of humans and animals. It colonizes newborn infants, who are spared from toxin-induced diarrheal disease. Pathogenic for human beings, guinea pigs, and rabbits; frequent cause of colitis and diarrhea following antibiotic use. Found to be a cause of pseudomembranous colitis and associated with a number of intestinal diseases that are linked to antibiotic therapy; also the chief cause of nosocomial diarrhea.
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Clostridium difficile

(dĭf′ĭ-sēl′, dĭf′ĭ-sēl′, dĭf′ĭ-kē′lā)
n.
A bacterium that causes an infectious form of severe diarrhea especially in elderly people on antibiotic therapy and in hospitalized patients. Also called C. diff..

Clostridium difficile

A common cause of bacterial colitis; it is the causative agent in 99% of pseudomembranous colitis, and 20-30% of antibiotic-associated diarrhea

Clos·trid·i·um dif·fi·ci·le

(klos-trid'ē-ŭm di-fis'i-lē)
Gram-positive obligate anaerobic or microaerophilic, rod-shaped bacterium; causes sometimes severe antibiotic-associated colitis.
Synonym(s): C-Diff, CDT.
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Clostridium difficile

A fecal organism endemic in hospitals and responsible for the majority of hospital-acquired cases of diarrhoea in elderly patients. Its prevalence in hospital is largely due to the high levels of antibiotic usage. Bowel infection can be cleared by oral treatment with the antibiotic vancomycin which is not appreciably absorbed into the bloodstream. Up to 40 percent of hospitalized patients are colonized with this organism. Only about 3 percent of healthy adults carry it. A previously uncommon strain with variations in toxin genes has emerged as a cause of C. difficile -associated disease.
References in periodicals archive ?
Vancomycin and metrodinazole are older antibiotics used to treat CDI, and a narrow-spectrum antibiotic designed to destroy C. diff, fidaxomicin (Dificid), has also been approved.
There is also a recently approved antibody that can bind to and deactivate the toxin produced by C. diff to help those with mrCDI.
Lysol and other solutions that do not contain bleach will not destroy C. diff bacteria or spores.
Ideally, Griffin said, you should isolate someone with C. diff in his or her own room, with an individual toilet to use to limit the transmission of bacteria around the facility.
Really, McDonald said, it's a question of whether you can isolate the C. diff resident, and, if not, determining who is the safest resident to put into a room with him or her.
If there's another C. diff patient, get them in with them," McDonald advised.
Shock new figures from the Health Protection Agency (HPA) show the worst performing trust in the country for C. diff among over 65s is University Hospitals of Leicester.
Yet four of the 10 worst nationally for C. diff cases are in our area; Leicester, Gloucestershire, University Hospitals of North Staffordshire and Heart of England NHS Trust.
Of those deaths linked to C. Diff at the James Paget University Hospital in Gorleston, Norfolk, most were aged over 65 and some in their 80s.
Patients suspected of having C. Diff are now being put in isolation rooms and 15 more staff have been recruited to carry out new cleaning procedures.
Figures in February showed that C. Diff was linked to twice as many deaths as MRSA.
But the presence of C. Diff has been noted on their death certificates and is said to have "contributed to their death".