Cyclospora cayetanensis

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Cyclospora cayetanensis

a species causing enteritis with persistent diarrhea; usually acquired by ingestion of contaminated water or food.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

Cyclospora cayetanensis

Parasitology A Cryptosporidium-like coccidian protozoan, family Eimeriidae, which is implicated in episodic traveler's diarrhea; it infects the GI tract of immunocompetent and immunocompromised hosts–especially with AIDS. See Cyclosporiasis.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Cy·clo·spo·ra ca·ye·ta·nen·sis

(sī'klō-spōr'ă kā-ĕ-tă-nen'sis)
A parasitic species causing enteritis with persistent diarrhea; usually acquired by ingestion of contaminated water or food.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Embassy Health Unit in Jakarta identified 28 C. cayetanensis infections among 206 patients (13.6%) with gastrointestinal illness or diarrhea who were examined during an 11-month period in 1998.
First reported in patients in New Guinea in 1977 but thought to be a coccidian parasite of the genus Isospora, C. cayetanensis received little attention until it was again described in 1985 in New York and Peru.
La infeccion por C. cayetanensis esta ampliamente distribuida en el mundo.
coli - 1/36 (2,8) 10/104 (9,6) 0,701 C. cayetanensis 1/10 (10) 3/36 (8,3) 4/104 (3,8) 0,712 Cryptosporidium - 1/36 (2,77) 2/104 (1,9) 0,271 spp.
To identify potential genotyping markers, we sequenced the genome of 1 C. cayetanensis isolate (CHN_HEN01) from Henan, China (3), and searched for microsatellite and minisatellite sequences among the first 40 of 4,811 assembled contigs by using Tandem Repeat Finder software (http://tandem.bu.edu/trf/trf.html).
duodenalis and C. cayetanensis. The participant whose water source was unprotected was infected with E.
Of 30 persons who ate at restaurant A, 22 had laboratory-confirmed C. cayetanensis infections, and eight had no laboratory confirmation.
Clinical laboratories probably did not identify the organism in many samples that contained it because the procedures to identify C. cayetanensis are not routine, and most microbiologists had not seen the organism before.
C. cayetanensis, first recognized as a source of illness in 1977, caused more than 900 confirmed cases in 20 states and the Canadian provinces of Ontario and Quebec this summer, according to the CDC's July 9 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.
In 1999, three new distinct Cyclospora species noted for their close similarity with C. cayetanensis from humans were isolated from monkeys in Ethiopia (4).