Clostridium difficile

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Clos·trid·i·um dif·fi·cile

Avoid the mispronunciation dĭf-ĭ-sēl' of this Latin word, which is correctly pronounced dĭ-fĭs'ĭ-lē.
a bacterial species found in feces of humans and animals. It colonizes newborn infants, who are spared from toxin-induced diarrheal disease. Pathogenic for human beings, guinea pigs, and rabbits; frequent cause of colitis and diarrhea following antibiotic use. Found to be a cause of pseudomembranous colitis and associated with a number of intestinal diseases that are linked to antibiotic therapy; also the chief cause of nosocomial diarrhea.
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Clostridium difficile

(dĭf′ĭ-sēl′, dĭf′ĭ-sēl′, dĭf′ĭ-kē′lā)
n.
A bacterium that causes an infectious form of severe diarrhea especially in elderly people on antibiotic therapy and in hospitalized patients. Also called C. diff..

Clostridium difficile

A common cause of bacterial colitis; it is the causative agent in 99% of pseudomembranous colitis, and 20-30% of antibiotic-associated diarrhea

Clos·trid·i·um dif·fi·ci·le

(klos-trid'ē-ŭm di-fis'i-lē)
Gram-positive obligate anaerobic or microaerophilic, rod-shaped bacterium; causes sometimes severe antibiotic-associated colitis.
Synonym(s): C-Diff, CDT.
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Clostridium difficile

A fecal organism endemic in hospitals and responsible for the majority of hospital-acquired cases of diarrhoea in elderly patients. Its prevalence in hospital is largely due to the high levels of antibiotic usage. Bowel infection can be cleared by oral treatment with the antibiotic vancomycin which is not appreciably absorbed into the bloodstream. Up to 40 percent of hospitalized patients are colonized with this organism. Only about 3 percent of healthy adults carry it. A previously uncommon strain with variations in toxin genes has emerged as a cause of C. difficile -associated disease.
References in periodicals archive ?
The fifth C diff patient "is still showing symptoms".
And the number of cases where C diff was cited on death certificates as the underlying cause increased dramatically, from 282 in 2005 to 570 in 2006, up nearly 98 per cent.
Councillor Deirdre Alden (Con Edgbaston), who chairs the city's health scrutiny committee, admitted she was not surprised by the sharp increase in C diff deaths.
The review was held after one hospital trust admitted it was suffering from an outbreak of C diff and that 24 people had died since last July.
Mr McGimpsey said: "I fully acknowledge the current outbreak of the virulent 027 strain of C diff in the Northern Trust is of great concern to the public.
It listed C Diff - clostridium difficile - and associated diarrhoea, along with acute renal failure, with pneumonia as the primary cause of death.
Peter spoke out as it emerged that more than 400 deaths in Scotland were linked to C Diff last year.
The patient was one of 55 infected with C diff at the hospital in Alexandria, Dunbartonshire, since the start of the year.
Unlike MRSA, C diff infection rates are on the rise, with an eight per cent jump between 2005 and 2006 to more than 55,000 in England.
The elderly are particularly at risk of C Diff - which causes severe diarrhoea, fever and abdominal pain.
The bug contributed to a further eight deaths while a total of 54 patients caught C diff since the start of the year.
It also warned that C diff was endemic in hospitals.