Clostridium difficile

(redirected from C dif)
Also found in: Dictionary.

Clos·trid·i·um dif·fi·cile

Avoid the mispronunciation dĭf-ĭ-sēl' of this Latin word, which is correctly pronounced dĭ-fĭs'ĭ-lē.
a bacterial species found in feces of humans and animals. It colonizes newborn infants, who are spared from toxin-induced diarrheal disease. Pathogenic for human beings, guinea pigs, and rabbits; frequent cause of colitis and diarrhea following antibiotic use. Found to be a cause of pseudomembranous colitis and associated with a number of intestinal diseases that are linked to antibiotic therapy; also the chief cause of nosocomial diarrhea.
[L. difficult]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

Clostridium difficile

(dĭf′ĭ-sēl′, dĭf′ĭ-sēl′, dĭf′ĭ-kē′lā)
n.
A bacterium that causes an infectious form of severe diarrhea especially in elderly people on antibiotic therapy and in hospitalized patients. Also called C. diff..
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

Clostridium difficile

A common cause of bacterial colitis; it is the causative agent in 99% of pseudomembranous colitis, and 20-30% of antibiotic-associated diarrhea
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Clos·trid·i·um dif·fi·ci·le

(klos-trid'ē-ŭm di-fis'i-lē)
Gram-positive obligate anaerobic or microaerophilic, rod-shaped bacterium; causes sometimes severe antibiotic-associated colitis.
Synonym(s): C-Diff, CDT.
[L. difficult]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

Clostridium difficile

A fecal organism endemic in hospitals and responsible for the majority of hospital-acquired cases of diarrhoea in elderly patients. Its prevalence in hospital is largely due to the high levels of antibiotic usage. Bowel infection can be cleared by oral treatment with the antibiotic vancomycin which is not appreciably absorbed into the bloodstream. Up to 40 percent of hospitalized patients are colonized with this organism. Only about 3 percent of healthy adults carry it. A previously uncommon strain with variations in toxin genes has emerged as a cause of C. difficile -associated disease.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Under +5 [degrees] C DIF, the concentration of nitrate in leaves was highest with constant root heating, but under +14 [degrees] C DIF it was highest with roots heated in the day (Fig.
Amino acid concentrations were highest with constant root-zone heating under +5 [degrees] C air DIF, but they were similar for constant and day heating under +14 [degrees] C DIF (data not shown).
Under +14 [degrees] C DIF, Caruso had the highest concentrations with constant heating, and concentrations in Buffalo did not differ among regimes with root-zone heating.
The potassium in stems was higher under +5 [degrees] C compared with +14 [degrees] C DIF, 60 and 68 rag [g.sup.-1] respectively.
Roots of plants grown under +14 [degrees] C DIF had more nitrogen than those grown under +5 [degrees] C DIF, and unheated roots and those heated in the night had significantly more nitrogen than those heated in the day or constantly (Table 3).