Clostridium difficile

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Clos·trid·i·um dif·fi·cile

Avoid the mispronunciation dĭf-ĭ-sēl' of this Latin word, which is correctly pronounced dĭ-fĭs'ĭ-lē.
a bacterial species found in feces of humans and animals. It colonizes newborn infants, who are spared from toxin-induced diarrheal disease. Pathogenic for human beings, guinea pigs, and rabbits; frequent cause of colitis and diarrhea following antibiotic use. Found to be a cause of pseudomembranous colitis and associated with a number of intestinal diseases that are linked to antibiotic therapy; also the chief cause of nosocomial diarrhea.
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Clostridium difficile

(dĭf′ĭ-sēl′, dĭf′ĭ-sēl′, dĭf′ĭ-kē′lā)
n.
A bacterium that causes an infectious form of severe diarrhea especially in elderly people on antibiotic therapy and in hospitalized patients. Also called C. diff..

Clostridium difficile

A common cause of bacterial colitis; it is the causative agent in 99% of pseudomembranous colitis, and 20-30% of antibiotic-associated diarrhea

Clos·trid·i·um dif·fi·ci·le

(klos-trid'ē-ŭm di-fis'i-lē)
Gram-positive obligate anaerobic or microaerophilic, rod-shaped bacterium; causes sometimes severe antibiotic-associated colitis.
Synonym(s): C-Diff, CDT.
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Clostridium difficile

A fecal organism endemic in hospitals and responsible for the majority of hospital-acquired cases of diarrhoea in elderly patients. Its prevalence in hospital is largely due to the high levels of antibiotic usage. Bowel infection can be cleared by oral treatment with the antibiotic vancomycin which is not appreciably absorbed into the bloodstream. Up to 40 percent of hospitalized patients are colonized with this organism. Only about 3 percent of healthy adults carry it. A previously uncommon strain with variations in toxin genes has emerged as a cause of C. difficile -associated disease.
References in periodicals archive ?
Diarrhea is a side effect of some antibiotics, so it can be difficult to know if diarrhea is indicative of C difficile colitis.
Health company Quidel Corporation (NASDAQ:QDEL) reported on Tuesday the receipt of CE mark for the AmpliVue C difficile assay for the detection of toxigenic Clostridium difficile bacterial DNA.
The company stated AmpliVue C difficile assay is its non-instrumented molecular test and will allow labs to quickly implement a fast and sensitive molecular method without the purchase of expensive capital equipment.
(13) In addition, tests should be used only for diagnosis, and not as a "test of cure" This is because patients can shed C difficile toxin and spores for several weeks after completing treatment, and there are wide variations in the sensitivity of toxin assays.
Infants <1 year old have high rates of asymptomatic toxigenic strains of C difficile, and until 2008, recommendations from SHEA discouraged testing the stools of such young patients.
Clear differentiation exists between the patient who is colonized with C difficile and the patient who becomes infected with the organism.
In one recent investigation, C difficile spores were found in the environment, including toilets and commodes, in approximately 33% of hospital rooms inhabited with asymptomatic patients (Dubberke et.
The report also reveals there were three MRSA and 26 C Difficile deaths at the University Hospital of Hartlepool between 2002 and 2006 and nine MRSA and five C Difficile deaths at the Friarage in Northallerton.
The number of deaths with C difficile mentioned rose to 3,807 and MRSA mentions on certificates increased to 1,629.
However, some patients have C difficile for extremely long periods of time; some do not have resolution and may be recommended for immunoglobulin therapy (Wilcox, 2004) or donor stool transplant involving replacement of a patient's stool with normal bowel flora (Aas, Gessert, & Bakken, 2003).
(2) CDI should not be confused with non-toxigenic or asymptomatic C difficile colonization.
The incidence of C difficile infection for all members during 1993 to 1997 was 14.8 cases per 100,000 person-years of enrollment.