res ipsa loquitur

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Latin for ‘the thing speaks for itself.’ A legal doctrine under which a plaintiff’s burden to prove a defendant’s negligence is minimal and may not require expert witnesses as the details of the incident are clear and understandable to a jury—e.g., foreign objects, gauze, surgical instruments, left in the patient during surgery

res ipsa loquitur

The thing speaks for itself Law & medicine A legal doctrine under which a plaintiff's burden to prove negligence is minimal as the details of the incident are clear and understandable to a jury–eg, foreign objects left behind during surgery, eg towels. See Medical malpractice.

res ip·sa lo·qui·tur

(res ip'să lō'kwi-tŭr)
The thing speaks for itself; the circumstantial evidence (of malpractice) is obvious and does not require an expert witness to testify.
[L.]

res ip·sa lo·qui·tur

(res ip'să lō'kwi-tŭr)
Latin meaning the thing speaks for itself.
[L.]
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