burrow

(redirected from Burrowing animals)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

bur·row

(ber'ō),
1. A subcutaneous tunnel or tract made by a parasite (for example, scabies mite).
2. A sinus or fistula.
3. (Rare) To undermine or create a tunnel or tract through or beneath various tissue planes.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

burrow

(bur'ro)
A tunnel made in or under the skin (e.g., by an insect or a parasite).
See: cutaneous larva migrans; scabies
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
Other species of burrowing animals occur at Poco das Antas (e.g., paca, Agouti paca, and red-rumped agouti, Dasyprocta agouti) and it is possible that burrows dug by these animals could have been mistakenly classified as armadillo burrows.
By the following spring, burrowing animals had already begun to recolonize the area.
Angry flood victims last night hit out as a Government agency blamed burrowing animals for contributing to the floods that have left the North with a clean-up bill estimated at well over pounds 60m.
The fickle forces that be have decided to introduce rodent rules about burrowing animals.
Rickman said it seemed odd that animals like the gopher and salamander should be included as examples of burrowing animals.
* You're able to prevent burrowing animals in a raised bed by installing a hardware cloth in the bottom.
It is, however, recognised that other burrowing animals such as rabbits and badgers pose a far greater threat as they are not constrained to suitable stretches of nearby water.
It is not particularly encouraging that part of the reason for millions of pounds worth of destruction and personal misery appears to be the activities of burrowing animals ( rabbits, moles and badgers ( in flood defence walls.
Hagadorn conjectures that the Wisconsin jellyfish impressions probably remained intact because at the time, there weren't many scavengers or burrowing animals. Modern jellyfish stranded on a beach usually are quickly set upon by birds seeking an easy snack, he notes.
The fickle forces-that-be have decided to introduce rodent rules about burrowing animals.
The system of 200-year-old embankments, called argaes, found in the middle reaches of the River Severn are believed to have been damaged by livestock and burrowing animals.