burrow

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bur·row

(ber'ō),
1. A subcutaneous tunnel or tract made by a parasite (for example, scabies mite).
2. A sinus or fistula.
3. (Rare) To undermine or create a tunnel or tract through or beneath various tissue planes.

burrow

(bur'ro)
A tunnel made in or under the skin (e.g., by an insect or a parasite).
See: cutaneous larva migrans; scabies
References in periodicals archive ?
Dinilysia patagonica, a Late Cretaceous relative of modern snakes that lived roughly 90 million years ago, also had the balloon-shaped inner ear of a burrower, Yi and Norell report.
Furthermore, some of these shallow and more stable water bodies could have been colonized by marine burrowers, as indicated by the Thalassinoides-Uke traces at the top of some beds.
The decrease in the diversity not only in Ribeirioida, but also in the whole group of rostroconchs was explained as a competition of this group with the Ordovician bivalves (Pojeta 1979), which are mostly considered similarly to rostroconchs like infaunal burrowers. According to Pojeta (1979), the main competitive advantage for bivalves could be their adaptation to burrowing because they could better establish and keep their position in the sediment.
Burrowers exert dorsoventral forces against the elastic burrow walls, concentrating stressat the anterior burrow tip, which extends anteriorly by fracture (Dorgan et al., 2005, 2007).
No coincidence, then, that The Burrowers seems like Watership Down for adults, with Chris Packham in the all-seeing role of Fiver and graphics reminiscent of Tony Hart's best bits.
A case in point is fabulous new BBC Two series The Burrowers.
I don't know the Latin names, but they're all burrowers that hatch from early June through July.
darts The new series marks the start of the BBC's Summer of Wildlife, which will include a new daytime series, Springwatch In The Afternoon, presented by Nick Baker; Britain's Big Wildlife Revival, presented by Countryfile's Ellie Harrison, plus as a mini-series, The Burrowers, presented by Packham, about the lives of badgers, moles and rabbits.
Habit types based on species composition showed a similar pattern with free-living forms (58%) being the most dominant followed by tubiculous (29%) and burrowers (10%).
Abundances Number of taxa (families/orders included) Number of individuals Mean number of individuals Crustacea Mollusca ETO (Ephemeroptera, Trichoptera, Odonata) Ephemeroptera Trichoptera Odonata Non-insects (excluding crustaceans and molluscs) Non-insects Insects Oligochaeta Coleoptera (larvae and adults) Diptera (excluding Chironomidae) Diptera (including Chironimidae) Zooplankton Functional Feeding Groups Collectors Scrapers Shredders Predators Habits Burrowers Skaters Clingers Climbers Sprawlers Swimmers Swimmers (excluding zooplankton) Flyers Breathing Mechanisms Air breathers Gills Other
Cryptozoological bloodworms, Dune's sandworms, JT Petty's Burrowers, Alvanson and Negarestani's sentient oil and rat-swarms and machines that are digging: the ground beneath our feet is teeming with chthonic monsters, tellurian presences that chew through earth and nestle in burrows and reach up and snag and snare and pull back down into shifting dirt.