Burgess shale


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Related to Burgess shale: Cambrian Explosion

Burgess shale

500 million year-old fossil-bearing strata discovered in the Canadian Rockies by the American palaeontologist Charles Walcott. The fossils are extremely well preserved and many have no relationships with present day organisms. Collectively, the fossils show an explosion of early life in which the variety of body forms exceeds that of the whole of the present day animal kingdom. Most are now extinct but others have close relationships with organisms which gave rise to present day forms.
References in periodicals archive ?
The type of preservation that we know from the Burgess Shale and thought was relatively limited might be much more widespread than we previously presumed," comments Stefan Bengtson of Uppsala University in Sweden.
Visit the following links to learn more about the ROM's Burgess Shale collection and research: rom.
Charles Walcott, the scientist who first discovered the Burgess Shale, assumed that the first Hurdia fragments were part of a crustacean-like animal and that other parts of the same animal were individual jellyfish and sea cucumbers.
He also points out that several bag-like Ediacaran organisms resemble an enigmatic creature from the Burgess Shale called Mackenzia costalis, which looks a little like a zeppelin.
and the ROM were the only museums granted permission by Parks Canada to dig the Burgess Shale over this century.
But beyond its importance to science, the Burgess Shale is a gorgeous locale, nestled in the Canadian Rockies.
Thanks to a rapid burial under fine sediment, which sealed out scavengers and agents of decay, the Burgess shale preserves a unique snapshot of life in the heyday of the skeletal revolution.
The well-preserved remains of more than 100 species of arthropods (invertebrates such as insects, scorpions and millipedes), sponges and other creatures, embedded in the Burgess shale since the Middle Cambrian 530 million years ago, provided scientists with a distinctly rare glimpse of life near its very beginnings.
The half-billion-year-old Burgess Shale, a spectacularly rich fossil site in Yoho National Park in BC's Rocky Mountains, provides a rare window into a crucial phase in the history of early life on Earth.
Gallery of Earth and Early Life n Opening 2009/2010 The record of life and the story of species extinction will be told through exceptional fossil specimens and artifacts from the Earth's distant past, including the ROM's internationally respected collection of Burgess Shale fossils.
The peculiar fossils--some of which had unusual numbers of eyes and odd body shapes--come from the famous Burgess Shale site in BC, a place well known for the excellent preservation of its fossils.
Perhaps the most iconic of all exceptional fossil deposits is the Burgess Shale of Canada, popularised by Stephen J.