disease burden

(redirected from Burden of disease)
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disease burden

The total effect of a disease on an individual or on a society.
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The Global Burden of Disease Study (GBD) is the most comprehensive worldwide observational epidemiological study to date.
Local Burden of Disease), and Regional Burden of Disease rates ranging from 10.6 to 210 per 1,000 infants, depending on the exposure scenario considered (as described in the counterfactual analysis).
Burden of Disease Collaborators, who authored the report.
A comparative risk assessment of burden of disease and injury attributable to 67 risk factors and risk factor clusters in 21 regions, 1990 - 2010: A systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2010.
The Global Burden of Disease Study 2015 analysed figures on smoking prevalence and deaths from more than 2,800 data sources in 195 counties.
The results from a Global Burden of Disease study published in The Lancet indicate that across the world deaths from chronic kidney disease (CKD) are increasing among both women and men.
Global and regional mortality from 235 causes of death for 20 age groups in 1990 and 2010: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2010.
The New Global Burden of Disease study for 2015 (GBD 2015) by Washington University's Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME) registered 24.6 deaths per 10,000 deliveries last year, compared with 22 in 2013.
We commend these authors for their dedication to improve treatment for women with HIV and cervical cancer in this rising burden of disease that has had limited research to date.
The paper titled "Health in times of uncertainty in the Eastern Mediterranean region, 1990-2013: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013" also finds that chronic diseases, such as heart disease and diabetes, cause a greater burden to health in the region overall than communicable diseases like diarrheal diseases and tuberculosis.
The study from the Global Burden of Disease collaborative network, published in The Lancet HIV, found that 74 countries saw increases in age-standardized rates of new infections between 2005 and 2015, including Egypt, Pakistan, Kenya, the Philippines, Cambodia, Mexico, and Russia.
The second edition of the report, Preventing disease through healthy environments: a global assessment of the burden of disease from environmental risks, reveals that since the report was first published a decade ago, deaths due to non-communicable diseases (NCDs), mostly attributable to air pollution including exposure to second-hand tobacco smoke, amount to as much as 8.2 million of these deaths.