buoyancy

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buoyancy

(1) The degree to which a body floats in a liquid.
(2) The force exerted by a fluid on a floating body, which opposes the force of gravity and is equal to the  body’s density.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The vertical position is determined by the vertical force balance, therefore is influenced by the buoyancy force.
Thereby, two secondary cell appear at free surface due to surface tension whereas two large rotating cells with opposite directions dominate over entire domain due to buoyancy force.
As we knew, the flow dynamics in the molten pool had great relationship with driving forces such as recoil pressure, surface tension, buoyancy force, and gravity.
In addition, the research has pinpointed the buoyancy force applied from the life jacket as the main factor for the injuries during water entry technique.
According to Archimedes' principle, the buoyancy force must be equal to the weight of the volume of the fluid of the object should displace.
As it goes further away the temperature difference reduces which results in the decay of the buoyancy force and flow starts decreasing.
One problem in this approach is that the drag and buoyancy forces are calculated in only the grid locations, using relatively long time steps, which often causes excess rotation.
In the absence of cross-flow, V = 0 [??] Re (= Vl/[upsilon]) = 0, the u component of velocity remains unaffected by convective acceleration and thermal buoyancy force and (5) reduces to
Figures 3(a)-3(c) illustrate the critical Marangoni number, [M.sub.c], versus couple stress parameter, [N.sub.3], for the different values of feedback control, K, and electric number, L, in the absence of buoyancy force, Ra, is plotted with different temperature profiles.
Consider a steady and laminar incompressible two-dimensional mixed convective heat transfer of a viscoelastic fluid flow over a wedge in the presence of buoyancy force effects.
In liquids, where buoyancy force supports levitation, you can only use immiscible liquids such as a drop of oil in water," explains Dimos Poulikakos, Professor of Thermodynamics and head of the research project.