bunyip

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bunyip

A creature that is an integral part of the Australian aboriginal mythology, which translates loosely as devil or evil spirit. The bunyip is said to live in swamps and waterholes in southeastern Australia; recorded descriptions—canine facies, dark fur, flippers, tail and tusks—overlap those of marine seals and sea lions which occasionally wander inland. There are neither credible photos nor dissected skeletons of the bunyip.

bunyip

a mythical animal denizen of Australian swamps. Its ogreish reputation makes it a threatening figure to children.
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Tariq Sultan, CEO of Bunya, said: "We thank Tamouh, Reem Investments and Sorouh for collaborating with us to achieve this shared vision.
Bunya Hill is located in Sutton Forest, south west of Sydney.
Initially under the name of Reem Properties, and then Bayt Al Khidma Properties, Bunya was established to act as the municipality of Al Reem Island and to provide all the infrastructure of regional roads and bridges as well as coordinate with the local authorities for the supply of water, electricity, natural gas and telecommunications and leading companies to provide district cooling, sewage water treatment and solid waste management.
Bunya is owned by the three master developers of Reem Island, Tamouh Investments, Sorouh Real Estate and Reem Investments, and is the municipal and resident regulatory authority and developer of regional infrastructure, utilities and sewage treatment on Reem Island.
1) It is situated on one of the main routes used historically by Aboriginal peoples to travel between the southeast Queensland coast and the Bunya Mountains (Gilbert 1992; Petrie 1904:16; Thompson 2004).
Bunya was allegedly unrepentant when challenged by the secret police agent and was arrested.
Praed also emphasises the perilous proximity of savagery to the settlers by explaining the cause of the massacre as the 'seething of foul blood and the unchaining of wild passions' during the local bunya festival.
Almost like a koala, Jones had made a bunya pine his home for several weeks, building a small shelter to protect himself from the elements, getting along well with neighboring opossums, and providing inspiration for those on the ground.
The Aboriginal people of this area, the Birpai, Nagamba and Bunya people, call it Dooragan, their protector.
The araucarias (notably the Bunya Bunya, the Hoop pine and the Norfolk Island pine) were favoured for their dark foliage and great height; some saw them as bizarre symbols of civilised dominance in the wilderness', (17) but emphasis was placed on the more cherished species from home.
cunninghamii), from New South Wales, and the bunya-bunya, or bunya pine (A.
This mystical visionary, fundamentally quietistic and drawn to still centres, was also a rabble-rousing activist; but manque, since there was no rabble to rouse except a few bemused habitues of little magazines and resentful Cantos readers who tended to switch off when they came to bits like 'It is true that the interest is now legally lower / but the banks lead to the bunya / who can thus lend more to her victims'.