bunting

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Related to Buntings: snow buntings

bunting

a behavior of cats in which they rub or push their face against objects, probably depositing glandular secretions; a form of olfactory communication.

bunting order
the equivalent to peck order of birds in the species that assert themselves by bunting with the head. It is the form of behavior by which Felidae establish themselves in the hierarchy of their social group.
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Snow buntings are attractive birds in winter, with a sandy buff wash to their white plumage, though in summer the males are particularly spectacular with all-white heads and underparts contrasting with their black wings.
Preparations for the upcoming Independence Day have been started as vendors have set up colorful stalls of bunting, national flags, banners and pictures of national heroes in different markets of twin cities.
Salman, a young boy said, "I have bought stickers, bunting and flags to decorate my home on I-Day.
Apparently none of these leading ornithologists and Audubon scholars caught the reference to the "Iowa Buntings.
Lewis Inlet, Labrador (55[degrees] 22' N, 55[degrees] 41' W), while the bird was foraging with a mixed group of snow buntings and Lapland longspurs (Fig.
Since 2000, Bunting has awarded 103 scholarships totaling nearly $45,000 in recognition of the founders of the company.
The study, published in the Journal of Applied Ecology, showed measures targeted at supporting corn buntings, including increasing the amount of food available to them and delaying mowing grassland where they were nesting, increased numbers by 5.
Bunting later mixed such bitterness with stoicism and with praise, showing how language and its most diligent users can endure, if not repair, a damaged world.
Later that day the Little Bunting showed briefly so plans were made for a return visit.
In sputtering argument with his father, a Church of England clergyman, Bunting propounds such arguments as: "I don't believe that a God exists who created the world we live in.
A lay observer could easily conclude that male indigo buntings are such vigorous songsters because they have relatively little else to do from the day they arrive at their breeding territories-two weeks ahead of the females-until their progeny have fledged.
There is also the saving grace of Buntings bluff good humor, as displayed in this brisk little cadenza on the mixed fortunes of Wordsworth: