Bunsen burner

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Bun·sen burn·er

(bŭn'sĕn bern'ĕr),
A gas lamp supplied with lateral openings admitting sufficient air so that the carbon is completely burned, thus giving a very hot but only slightly luminous flame.
[RW Bunsen, 1811-1899]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

Bunsen burner

A standard laboratory device which is attached to a stream of natural gas (e.g., methane), or a liquefied petroleum gas (e.g., propane and/or butane), which produces an adjustable flame for heating chemical reactions, sterilisation of equipment and combustion.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

Bun·sen burn·er

(bŭn'sĕn bŭr'nĕr)
A gas lamp supplied with openings admitting sufficient air that carbon is completely burned, giving a hot but only slightly luminous flame.
[R.W. Bunsen, 1811-1899]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

Bunsen,

Robert W., German chemist and physicist, 1811-1899.
Bunsen burner - a gas lamp giving a very hot but only slightly luminous flame.
Bunsen solubility coefficient - the milliliters of gas STPD dissolved per milliliter of liquid and per atmosphere (760 mmHg) partial pressure of the gas at any given temperature.
Bunsen-Roscoe law - in two photochemical reactions, if the product of the intensity of illumination and the time of exposure are equal, the quantities of chemical material undergoing change will be equal. Synonym(s): reciprocity law; Roscoe-Bunsen law
Roscoe-Bunsen law - Synonym(s): Bunsen-Roscoe law
Medical Eponyms © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Whereas these liturgies, which were originally designed for the Protestant community in Rome, have probably scarcely been used in practice,(46) Bunsen's most important liturgical work came to a certain, if limited, popularity in England as well as in Germany.
In the second edition, Bunsen took this problem into consideration--with the result that the Prayer Book now consisted of two parts, one for use in Church and one for individual use at home.(50) Although this was certainly a good step towards the intended goal, it brought with it some very strange consequences.
In Bunsen's most important theoretical works on theology, which he wrote in the last decade of his life, he tried to establish a connection between his various concrete interests like liturgy and worship, patristic studies, ideas on the constitution of the Church, etc., by means of a very abstract, Christian philosophy of history.(53) Whether this Hegelian endeavour to force the most remote fields into one conception of thought is convincing or not (presumably most modern readers would find it rather bewildering), it shows that for Bunsen his liturgical work was not just a learned pastime.
So, Bunsen's work does not claim less than to unite the two-fold answer of humanity to the message of the Bible in one liturgical book.
To sum up: the Book of Common Prayer was an important factor in Bunsen's theological thought from the very beginning.
At the end of the twentieth century Bunsen's actual selection of prayers and hymns deserves only historical interest.