Bunsen burner

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Bun·sen burn·er

(bŭn'sĕn bern'ĕr),
A gas lamp supplied with lateral openings admitting sufficient air so that the carbon is completely burned, thus giving a very hot but only slightly luminous flame.
[RW Bunsen, 1811-1899]

Bunsen burner

[boo͡n′sən, bun′sən]
Etymology: Robert E.W. Bunsen, German chemist, 1811-1899
a standard laboratory gas burner designed to produce nearly complete combustion in a smokeless flame.

Bunsen burner

A standard laboratory device which is attached to a stream of natural gas (e.g., methane), or a liquefied petroleum gas (e.g., propane and/or butane), which produces an adjustable flame for heating chemical reactions, sterilisation of equipment and combustion.

Bun·sen burn·er

(bŭn'sĕn bŭr'nĕr)
A gas lamp supplied with openings admitting sufficient air that carbon is completely burned, giving a hot but only slightly luminous flame.
[R.W. Bunsen, 1811-1899]

Bunsen,

Robert W., German chemist and physicist, 1811-1899.
Bunsen burner - a gas lamp giving a very hot but only slightly luminous flame.
Bunsen solubility coefficient - the milliliters of gas STPD dissolved per milliliter of liquid and per atmosphere (760 mmHg) partial pressure of the gas at any given temperature.
Bunsen-Roscoe law - in two photochemical reactions, if the product of the intensity of illumination and the time of exposure are equal, the quantities of chemical material undergoing change will be equal. Synonym(s): reciprocity law; Roscoe-Bunsen law
Roscoe-Bunsen law - Synonym(s): Bunsen-Roscoe law
References in periodicals archive ?
103), Bunsen gave it to von Witzleben on 18 December 1822 in Rome and to the King in spring 1828 in Berlin.
28) Bunsen, though, had the impression that the King had thoroughly read his article, cf.
29) On the interesting relationship between Bunsen and the crown prince cf.
42) Christian Carl Josias Bunsen, Die heilige Leidensgeschichte und die stifle Woche, 2 pts (Hamburg, 1841).
46) In Rome the liturgy was abolished shortly after Bunsen had left, cf.
Frances Bunsen gives an account of where the book was used or even officially introduced, Memoir (op.
49) In his introduction Bunsen claims that the structure has to follow the order of the liturgy (Allgemeines .
52) It should be mentioned that Bunsen did not only try to enrich the German liturgy with elements from the English tradition, but also the other way round.
57) Bunsen himself wrote that in his later years, `I become more and more aware that what I have intended and desired with my whole heart, is not suitable for the present, from which I am separated by a gulf of 25 years' life on the Capitol and in England'.