Bunsen burner


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Bun·sen burn·er

(bŭn'sĕn bern'ĕr),
A gas lamp supplied with lateral openings admitting sufficient air so that the carbon is completely burned, thus giving a very hot but only slightly luminous flame.
[RW Bunsen, 1811-1899]

Bunsen burner

[boo͡n′sən, bun′sən]
Etymology: Robert E.W. Bunsen, German chemist, 1811-1899
a standard laboratory gas burner designed to produce nearly complete combustion in a smokeless flame.

Bunsen burner

A standard laboratory device which is attached to a stream of natural gas (e.g., methane), or a liquefied petroleum gas (e.g., propane and/or butane), which produces an adjustable flame for heating chemical reactions, sterilisation of equipment and combustion.

Bun·sen burn·er

(bŭn'sĕn bŭr'nĕr)
A gas lamp supplied with openings admitting sufficient air that carbon is completely burned, giving a hot but only slightly luminous flame.
[R.W. Bunsen, 1811-1899]

Bunsen,

Robert W., German chemist and physicist, 1811-1899.
Bunsen burner - a gas lamp giving a very hot but only slightly luminous flame.
Bunsen solubility coefficient - the milliliters of gas STPD dissolved per milliliter of liquid and per atmosphere (760 mmHg) partial pressure of the gas at any given temperature.
Bunsen-Roscoe law - in two photochemical reactions, if the product of the intensity of illumination and the time of exposure are equal, the quantities of chemical material undergoing change will be equal. Synonym(s): reciprocity law; Roscoe-Bunsen law
Roscoe-Bunsen law - Synonym(s): Bunsen-Roscoe law
References in periodicals archive ?
Without the personal touch, it will neither attract nor hold my attention, and I'm back to that Bunsen burner.
Q MY chemistry teacher claims the Bunsen burner was invented by a man named Bunsen but I remember seeing something on TV saying someone else invented it.
But giving her an unexpected bang trim next time you're working the Bunsen burner would a) get you suspended and b) completely blow your chances of getting The Guy.
WHEN Captain Hook, our science teacher with the unfortunate nose, said today's lesson would be about currents, I showed a spark of enthusiasm that could have lit a Bunsen burner.
Yet it gives the still wannabe Scientist inside of me a glow like that of a Bunsen burner that books such as these might just open the door for the next generation or explorers of information and seekers of answers to step through.
A sample is held in place (E) and combusted in a Bunsen burner or similar flame (D).
Elementary kids don't have the ability to manipulate a Bunsen burner and a test tube, but that doesn't mean they don't like to see it," Kordek says.
You can't tell if gas is running to the unlit Bunsen burner sitting on the table.
As a birthday present to the much-loved singer, his fans are recording and helping to market his forthcoming single Bunsen Burner, which is being released on September 30.
In 1860, Robert Bunsen and Gustav Kirchhoff demonstrated how they could identify useful elements such as iron, copper and lead, or sodium and potassium, in potential ores, by the colors that powdered specimens sprinkled into a Bunsen burner flame produced.
So Paul emptied the sand-filled red fire bucket, threw in some potatoes, vegetables and meat, and cooked a stew over a Bunsen burner.