Bulrush


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A reed, the pollen of which is astringent, diuretic, fibrinolytic, haemostatic, vasotonic
Used for Dysmenorrhea, hepatitis, postpartum pain, traumatic hemorrhage, spermatorrhea
References in periodicals archive ?
The symbolic tree-like bulrushes stand at attention, forming a patterned backdrop for the whole scene.
Scrambling to save this imperiled habitat, Blackwater managers and Maryland officials have asked Congress for $2.9 million to help study ways to evict nutria from coastal marshes and restore the damaged bulrush mats.
Effect of light and simulated herbivory on growth of endangered northeastern bulrush, Scirpus ancistrochaetus Schuyler.
Speaking of the lower Murray River in South Australia, Angas said, `The staff of their existence is the bulrush root which the women gather among reeds, it is to them what bread is to the European' (Angas 1847b, 89).
I looked up just in time to see a flock of teal bearing down through the bulrushes that helped conceal my camo-clad outline.
I AM experimenting with a number of new composts from the Bulrush company in Ireland.
"The Kissimmee grass grows out to about four feet, as do the buggy whips (bulrush).
Casting, pitching, and flipping can all apply to bulrush fishing, depending on density of the plants and water depth.
As I walked toward the new hide, a water rail screamed like a stuck pig deep in a bulrush bed, and long tailed tits squeaked in bare branches above me.
Bulrush (1.45) found Solerina far too hot for him when fourth on his hurdling debut at Thurles last month.
Also productive is submerged vegetation like the hydrilla common to big-bass powerhouses such as lakes Toho and Okeechobee, the Harris Chain's eel grass, reeds and bulrush (aka "buggy whips.")
In three Minnesota lakes, biologists found black crappies are more likely to nest near undeveloped shorelines with emergent vegetation (hardstem bulrush) and shoreline canopy cover.