citrate

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citrate

 [sit´rāt, si´trāt]
any anionic form, salt, or ester of citric acid.
citrate phosphate dextrose (CPD) a solution containing citric acid, sodium citrate, monobasic sodium phosphate, and dextrose that is the primary anticoagulant used for preservation of whole blood or red blood cells for up to 21 days. The official USP name is anticoagulant citrate phosphate dextrose solution.
citrate phosphate dextrose adenine (CPDA-1) an anticoagulant solution, containing citric acid, sodium citrate, monobasic sodium phosphate, dextrose, and adenine, used for the preservation of whole blood and red blood cells for up to 35 days; it extends red cell survival by providing adenine needed for the maintenance of red cell ATP levels. The official USP name is anticoagulant citrate phosphate dextrose adenine solution.

cit·rate

(sit'rāt, sī'trāt), Avoid the eccentric pronunciation sī'trāt, which is supported by precedent or analogy with related words.
A salt or ester of citric acid; used as anticoagulants because they bind calcium ions.

cit·rate

(sit'rāt)
A salt or ester of citric acid; used as an anticoagulant because it binds calcium ions.

cit·rate

(sit'rāt)
A salt or ester of citric acid; used as anticoagulant.
References in periodicals archive ?
This was due to the decreased solubility rates of highly ionic solutions and the increased concentration of buffering agents in the highly ionic samples.
Specifications for Identity and Purity of Food Additives: Anticaking Agents, Buffering Agents, Salts, Emulsifiers, Enzymes, Extraction Solvents, Flavouring Agents, and Miscellaneous Food Additives: 28th Session of the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives, Rome, March 1984.
Added ingredients include surfactants, abrasives, pH buffering agents, sequestrants, thickening agents, suspending agents, colorants and perfumes.