agent

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a·gent

(ā'jent),
1. An active force or substance capable of producing an effect. For agents not listed here, see the specific name.
2. In disease, a factor such as a microorganism, chemical substance, or a form of radiation, the presence or absence of which (as in deficiency diseases) results in disease or in more advanced form of disease.
[L. ago, pres. p. agens (agent-), to perform]

Agent

AGENT
Angiogenic GENe Therapy. A clinical trial evaluating the safety & efficacy of an angiogenic gene therapy, Ad5-FGF4 (fibroblast growth factor 4).
Primary endpoint 1-month, 3-month exercise tolerance.
Conclusion Early data indicate that Ad5-FGF4 significantly improves exercise time in treated patients.

Agent
Choice in dying An adult appointed by the declarant, under an advance directive executed or made in accordance with the legal provisions, to make health care decisions for the declarant. VA Bd of Medicine, 1997-98 § 54.1-2982
Epidemiology A factor (such as a microorganism, chemical substance, or form of radiation) whose excessive presence, or relative absence (in deficiency states), is essential for the occurrence of a disease.
Health insurance An insurance company representative licensed by the state who solicits, negotiates, or effects insurance contracts and who provides services to the policyholder for the insurer.
Infomatics A small mobile piece of computer software that can send itself across a computer network and perform a task on a remote machine.
Medspeak A thing capable of producing an effect.
Military A code term for a biological substance that can be used as a weapon of mass destruction.
Nutrition A substance added to a food to change a physical property.
Pharmaceutical industry An authorised person who acts on behalf of or at the direction of a manufacturer, distributor, or dispenser, not including a common or contract carrier, public warehouseman, or employee of the carrier warehouseman. VA Bd of Pharmacy, 7/97.
Pharmacology Any substance capable of producing a physical, chemical or biologic effect.
Virology An unidentified virus or pathogen.

agent

Clinical pharmacology An authorized person who acts on behalf of or at the direction of a manufacturer, distributor, or dispenser, which does not include a common or contract carrier, public warehouseman, or employee of the carrier warehouseman Choice in dying An adult appointed by the declarant under an advance directive, executed or made in accordance with the legal provisions, to make health care decisions for the declarant. See Declarant Epidemiology A factor, such as a microorganism, chemical substance, or form of radiation, whose excessive presence, or in deficiency diseases, relative absence, is essential for the occurrence of a disease Medtalk A thing capable of producing an effect. See Biological agent, Challenge agent, Controlled drug substance Scheduled agent, Cytoprotective agent, Cytotoxic agent, Dirty agent, Gene transfer agent, Intercalating agent, Nerve agent, Radiopaque contrast agent, Reducing agent, Reversal agent, Schedule I agent, Schedule II agent, Thrombolytic, Vesicant/blistering agent Pharmacology Any substance capable of producing a physical, chemical or biologic effect. See Alkylating agent, Antidiabetic agent, Antimitotic agent, Antineoplastic agent, Antiplatelet agent, Antipsychotic agent, Chemotherapeutic agent, Depolarizing agent, Inotropic agent, Keratolytic agent, Negative inotropic agent, Nondepolarizing agent, Positive inotropic agent Virology An unidentified virus or pathogen. See Creutzfeldt agent, Hawaii agent, Norwalk agent, Pittsburgh pneumonia agent, TORCH agent, TWAR agent.

AGENT

Cardiology A clinical trial–Angiogenic Gene Therapy

a·gent

(ā'jĕnt)
1. An active force or substance capable of producing an effect.
2. A factor such as a microorganism, chemical substance, or a form of radiation, the presence or absence of which (as in deficiency diseases) results in disease or more advanced disease.
[L. ago, pres. p. agens (agent-), to perform]

a·gent

(ā'jĕnt)
1. An active force or substance capable of producing an effect.
2. In disease, a factor such as a microorganism, chemical substance, or a form of radiation, the presence or absence of which (as in deficiency diseases) results in disease or in more advanced form of disease.
[L. ago, pres. p. agens (agent-), to perform]

Patient discussion about agent

Q. Has anyone had an allergic reaction to gadolinium dye, MRI contrast agents, I have had a severe reaction. I would like to know the long term effects of this dye. And if anyone else has had or heard of problems and reactions to it. Please answer me. Thank you

A. In 1969 I almost died from the IVP dye. I had no idea I was allergic and when I awoke I was in a "recovery room." The doctor told me to always tell any physicians/paramedics etc of my allergy status regarding the dye. I now have chronic back pain, have a history of cancer in the family and the doctor wants to do a scan (including dye) but when I emphasized that I was allergic he backed off. Now I am wondering if there is anything else that can be done to test the bone (scan) without the dye. Any answers? Thanks

Q. Can anyone suggest a treatment for plantar fasciitis, apart from ultrasound, physio, anti-inflammatory agents? My friend has had Plantar Fasciitis for more than 1 year and has persevered with all the ususal treatments above plus lots of rest from weight-bearing and elevation.

A. Padded foot splints, silicone heels insert and special shoes (e.g. arch-supporting shoes) may also help. These are usually sold and fitted by a professional. Exercise is another important measure. Some patients benefit from avoiding walking barefoot or in sleepers but rather using shoes from the first step.

More advanced treatments include steroid-local anesthetics injections, botulinum toxin (similar to botox) injections and surgery.

The prognosis is usually favorable, and most patients achieve relief of the pain.

However, all of the above is just for general knowledge - if you have any specific question, you may want to consult a doctor.

You may read more here:
www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/007021.htm

More discussions about agent
References in periodicals archive ?
Further research using BAFLOP as a rumen buffering agent in in vivo feeding trials is urgently required.
The inclusion of buffering agents in the formulation can mitigate this risk, but must be added with care, as buffering ions may compete with the active ingredients.
In 1915, aspirin came onto the over-the-counter drug market, and today there is a huge variety of pain relievers that are spinoffs of aspirin, many offering buffering agents to protect against the still troublesome stomach side effects.
This was due to the decreased solubility rates of highly ionic solutions and the increased concentration of buffering agents in the highly ionic samples.
Specifications for Identity and Purity of Food Additives: Anticaking Agents, Buffering Agents, Salts, Emulsifiers, Enzymes, Extraction Solvents, Flavouring Agents, and Miscellaneous Food Additives: 28th Session of the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives, Rome, March 1984.
For example, Ascriptin, an adult treatment for minor aches and pains that debuted in 1955, is now available in four varieties: regular- and maximum-strength, which contain different doses of aspirin, calcium carbonate and the buffering agents found in Maalox; arthritis pain, with the same dose of aspirin as regular-strength, but with extra Maalox buffering ingredients, and enteric, containing aspirin, but formulated as coated caplets, and available in low-dose and regular-strength formulas introduced in 1996.
In addition to this, the natural buffering agents in the soil (the so-called acid-neutralizing capacity) have been heavily depleted in the Appalachians by acid rain, and the release of aluminum into rivers along the eastern seaboard could threaten those fish that swim upstream to spawn.
The abundance of these 2 mineral buffering agents (CaC[O.sub.3], DSP) was reduced considerably when red mud was pre-treated with acid, resulting in much less complex soil/red mud buffering curves (Fig.