buffer

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buffer

 [buf´er]
a substance that, by its presence in solution, increases the amount of acid or alkali necessary to produce a unit change in pH. The bicarbonate buffer system in the blood maintains a balance between bicarbonate and carbon dioxide ions and deterimnes the pH of the blood.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

buff·er

(bŭf'ĕr),
1. A mixture of an acid and its conjugate base (salt), such as H2CO3 or HCO3-; H2PO4-/HPO42-, that, when present in a solution, reduces any changes in pH that would otherwise occur in the solution when acid or alkali is added to it; thus, the pH of the blood and body fluids is kept relatively constant (pH 7.45) although acid metabolites are continually being formed in the tissues and CO2 is lost in the lungs.
See also: conjugate acid-base pair.
2. To add a buffer to a solution and thus give it the property of resisting a change in pH when it receives a limited amount of acid or alkali.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

buffer

Chemistry
(1) A chemical system that minimises the effects—in particular the pH—of changes in the concentration of a substance.

(2) A molecule that serves to prevent large changes in pH by either combining with H+ or by releasing H+ into solution. 

(3) A system that minimises the changes in specific chemical species in solution against addition or depletion of the species.

(4) pH buffers: weak acids or weak bases in aqueous solution. The working range is given by pKa +/ 1.

(5) Metal ion buffers: a metal ion chelator (e.g., EDTA), partially saturated by the metal ion acts, as a buffer for the metal ion.

Computers
A storage zone that “resides” temporarily in the RAM (random access memory) and contains either input or output data, remaining there while waiting for an output (or less commonly, an input) device—e.g., a printer—to allow it access to perform a function. Buffer sizes can be increased with “spooling” software or by increased the printer’s RAM.
 
Drug slang
Regional street drug slang for a crack smoker or a woman who exchanges oral sex for crack.
 
Molecular biology
 A solution containing agents which maintain a constant pH during a biochemical reaction.
 
Vox populi
A person who acts as a go-between.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

buffer

Chemistry A chemical system that minimizes the effects, in particular the pH, of changes in the concentration of a substance
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

buff·er

(bŭf'ĕr)
1. A mixture of an acid and its conjugate base (salt), such as H2CO3/HCO3; H2PO4/ HPO42-, which, when present in a solution, resists changes in pH that would otherwise occur in the solution when acid or alkali is added to it.
See also: conjugate acid-base pair
2. To add a buffer to a solution and thus give it the property of resisting a change in pH.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

buffer

a chemical substance which has the capacity to bond to H+ ions, removing them from solution when their concentration begins to rise and releasing H+ ions when their concentration begins to fall. In this way buffers stabilize the pH of biological solutions and are thus important in maintaining HOMEOSTASIS. HAEMOGLOBIN is an excellent example of a buffer, maintaining a stable pH in the ERYTHROCYTE.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
The symbol V expresses whether the program has stack buffer overflows and V is byte type.
Buffer overflows are limited to languages without array bounds checking; C and C++ are particularly problematic.
The ghttpd is a lightweight web server with a stack buffer overflow vulnerability reported in version 1.4.0-1.4.3.
Insecure coding can be the fault of modern programming languages such as C where it is less easy to guard against buffer overflow. This is the most widely used programming language for systems software today, despite dating back to the early 70s.
Libsafe 2.0 detects and protects against both format string and buffer overflow attacks, which allow a non-authorized user to take control of a server by exploiting loopholes.
Based on these performance factors, we provide a synchronized data replenishment mechanism (SDRM) that makes it possible to implicitly avoid the data buffer overflow as well as explicitly regulate the buffer underflow by adequately adjusting the buffer resilience under the given provisioning function.
It said more than a month ago that it would instead push the patch date into October.<p>Until a patch is released next week, Windows Vista and Windows 7 users can protect themselves by enabling Data Execution Prevention (DEP), a security feature designed to stop some kinds of exploits -- buffer overflow attacks in particular -- by blocking code from executing in memory that's supposed to contain only data.
Microsoft also provided a patch today for a vulnerability in the Microsoft Windows Domain Name System (DNS) Server that can trigger a stack-based buffer overflow in the Remote Procedure Call (RPC) interface, granting the attacker system privileges.
Proventia Server for Linux features vulnerability-based intrusion protection, support for Red Hat Enterprise Linux and SuSE Linux Enterprise servers and Buffer Overflow Exploit Prevention (BOEP).
The award-winning technology provides unmatched, "out-of-the-box" protection against unknown vulnerabilities, such as buffer overflow and zero-day attacks.