yeast

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yeast

 [yēst]
any of various unicellular, nucleated, usually rounded fungi that reproduce by budding; some are fermenters of carbohydrates, and a few are pathogenic for humans.
brewer's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, used in brewing beer, making alcoholic liquors, and baking bread.
dried yeast dried cells of any suitable strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, usually a by-product of the brewing industry; used as a natural source of protein and B-complex vitamins.

yeast

(yēst),
A general term denoting true fungi of the family Saccharomycetaceae that are widely distributed in substrates that contain sugars (such as fruits), and in soil, animal excreta, the vegetative parts of plants, etc. Because of their ability to ferment carbohydrates, some yeasts are important to the brewing and baking industries.
[A.S. gyst]

yeast

(yēst)
n.
1.
a. Any of various unicellular fungi of the genus Saccharomyces, especially S. cerevisiae, reproducing asexually by budding or sexually through the production of ascospores and capable of fermenting carbohydrates.
b. Any of numerous fungi that exhibit a one-celled growth form and reproduce by budding, including certain candidas that can cause infections in humans.
2. Froth consisting of yeast cells together with the carbon dioxide they produce in the process of fermentation, present in or added to fruit juices and other substances in the production of alcoholic beverages.
3. A powdered or compressed commercial preparation of yeast cells, used chiefly as a leavening agent or as a dietary supplement.

yeast

A unicellular spherical-to-oval 3–5 µm budding fungus that reproduces both sexually and asexually, primarily by budding–some by binary fission which, when adherent in end-to-end rows are termed pseudohyphae; most fungi are saprobes; many are used in commercial fermentation of foods and beverages; 7 genera–class Deuteromycetes–Imperfect Fungi–are human pathogens: Candida, Crytococcus, Geotrichum, Pityrosporum, Rhodotorula, Torulopsis, Trichosporon. See Candida, YAC cloning.

yeast

(yēst)
A general term denoting true fungi of the family Saccharomycetaceae that are widely distributed in substrates that contain sugars (such as fruits), and in soil, animal excreta,and the vegetative parts of plants. Because of their ability to ferment carbohydrates, some yeasts are important to the brewing and baking industries.
[A.S. gyst]

yeast

(yest)
Enlarge picture
BUDDING YEAST: (×400)
1. Any of several unicellular fungi of the genera Saccharomyces or Candida, which reproduce by budding. They are capable of fermenting carbohydrates. Yeasts, esp. Candida albicans, may cause systemic infections as well as vaginitis and oral thrush. Yeast infections are frequently present in patients with malignant lymphomas, poorly controlled diabetes mellitus, AIDS, or other conditions causing immunocompromise. Synonym: Saccharomyces See: illustration; Candida; candidiasis; fungi
2. A commercial product composed of meal impregnated with living fungi, used, for example, in fermenting beer and ale and baking bread.
Enlarge picture
BUDDING YEAST

brewer's yeast

Yeast obtained during the brewing of beer. It is a rich source of folic acid and chromium.
illustration

dried yeast

Dried yeast cells from strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. It is used as a source of proteins and vitamins, esp. B complex.

yeast

a collective name for those unicellular fungi, typically in the ASCOMYCOTA, of economic importance in the brewing and bread-making industries (see SACCHAROMYCES). Yeasts secrete ENZYMES that convert sugars into alcohol and carbon dioxide (see ALCOHOLIC FERMENTATION) and it is the CO2 which causes bread to ‘rise’.

yeast

(yēst)
A general term denoting true fungi that are widely distributed in substrates that contain sugars (e.g., fruits), and in soil, animal excreta, and vegetative parts of plants. Because of their ability to ferment carbohydrates, some yeasts are important in brewing and baking industries.
[A.S. gyst]

Patient discussion about yeast

Q. Yeast infection in bloodstream How to get rid of yeast infection systemically.

A. there are several treatments and medications against systemic fungal infections, yeasts included. but in order to get treated you have to go through a proper diagnosis and a Dr. should check what kind of fungus you are having and prescribe the medication that fits it. me throwing all sort of medication names won't give you anything. this has to be checked out with a blood test and a culture.

Q. yeast infection

A. Sorry, I posted this in the questions section by mistake - I thought I was doing an information search. I only just joined and I'm still getting used to this wonderful site. Many thanks for your quick response.

More discussions about yeast
References in periodicals archive ?
India ink prep test: Budding yeast cells surrounded by capsular or clear zone called a halo.
Although microscopic visualization of broad-based budding yeast can be diagnostic, fungal cultures of skin biopsies should always be done, especially when microscopy is inconclusive.
In this paper, we focus on the biological process domain of GO and annotations of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to validate the effectiveness of the proposed measures.
Cohen-Fix, "The role of Cdh1p in maintaining genomic stability in budding yeast," Genetics, vol.
cerevisiae budding yeast, from "start" to cell separation.
rosea root on lifespan and the activity of antioxidant enzymes in budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been studied.
Tubulin of the budding yeast S.cerevesia shares 76% sequence identity with bovine tubulin, but yeast tubulin isn't sensitive to taxol.
The presence of budding yeast like organisms staining with Gomori methenamine silver, results from the mucicarmine stain were consistent with cryptococcal infection (Fig-3 B).
Saccharomyces cerevisae is a species of budding yeast most commonly used in industries such as beer and bread.
Guthrie, an American Cancer Society research professor of molecular genetics, pioneered the use of budding yeast as a model organism for a mechanistic understanding of messenger RNA splicing.
In this study, we showed that budding yeast cells lacking the aging gene, UTH1, have more robust cell walls.