bubo

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bubo

 [bu´bo] (pl. bu´boes)
a tender, enlarged, and inflamed lymph node, particularly in the axilla or groin, resulting from absorption of infective material and occurring in various diseases, such as lymphogranuloma venereum, plague, syphilis, gonorrhea, chancroid, and tuberculosis.

bu·bo

(bū'bō),
Inflammatory swelling of one or more lymph nodes, usually in the groin; the confluent mass of nodes usually suppurates and drains pus.
[G. boubōn, the groin, a swelling in the groin]

bubo

/bu·bo/ (bu´bo) an enlarged and inflamed lymph node, particularly in the axilla or groin, due to such infections as plague, syphilis, gonorrhea, lymphogranuloma venereum, and tuberculosis.bubon´ic
climatic bubo  lymphogranuloma venereum.

bubo

(bo͞o′bō, byo͞o′-)
n. pl. bu·boes
An inflamed, tender swelling of a lymph node, especially in the area of the armpit or groin, that is characteristic of certain infectious diseases, such as bubonic plague, tuberculosis, and syphilis.

bubo

[byo̅o̅′bō] pl. buboes
Etymology: Gk, boubon, groin
a greatly enlarged, tender, inflamed lymph node usually in the groin that is associated with diseases such as chancroid, lymphogranuloma venereum, and syphilis. Treatment includes specific antibiotic therapy, application of moist heat, and sometimes incision and drainage.
A tender, swollen—4–5 cm in diameter—purplish lymph node most commonly seen in the inguinal or the axilla, classically associated with lymphogranuloma venereum, but also seen in primary syphilis—when it accompanies a chancre, gonorrhoea, and plague

bubo

Infectious disease A tender, swollen, 4-5 cm in diameter, purplish lymph node most commonly seen in the inguinal or the axilla; bubos are classically associated with lymphogranuloma venereum, but may be associated with 1º syphilis–when it accompanies a chancre, gonorrhea, plague–hence the name bubonic plague, TB, et al. See Pseudobubo.

bu·bo

(bū'bō)
Inflammatory swelling of one or more lymph nodes, usually (but not necessarily) in the groin.

bubo

A swelling in the groin, or in the armpit, from enlargement of one or more lymph nodes as a result of infection. Buboes occur in many infections including PLAGUE, CHANCROID, SYPHILIS, GONORRHOEA, LYMPHOGRANULOMA VENEREUM and TUBERCULOSIS.

Bubo

An inflamed swelling inside a lymph node, characteristic of second-stage LGV.

bu·bo

(bū'bō)
Inflammatory swelling of lymph nodes, usually in the groin; confluent mass of nodes suppurates and drains pus.

bubo (byōō´bō),

n a lymph node that is enlarged as a result of an infection. The process may lead to suppuration; seen in primary syphilis, chancroid, plague, malaria, and other infectious processes.

bubo

an enlarged and inflamed lymph node, particularly in the axilla or groin, resulting from absorption of infective material and occurring in various diseases, e.g. tuberculosis.

indolent bubo
a hard, nearly painless bubo that shows no tendency to break.
References in periodicals archive ?
Bubonic plague in which people develop buboes (enlarged, tender lymph nodes especially in the groin area) (Figure 3-58), sudden high fever, weakness, and chills.
Although plague buboes were most commonly found in the groin, as with Cuthbert, it was not unusual for them to attack the lymphatic glands below the ear; and such seems to have been the case with AEthelthryth.
Diagnosis is confirmed by culture and identification of the causative organism from fluid aspirated from buboes, blood, CSF, sputum or throat swab.
Indeed, because of its syntax--"Qui mieulx se sent, qu'on ne peult exprimer" (line 10)--the "mal" is all the more felt that it cannot be expressed; deadened expression gives greater feeling; and part of the "mal" stems from this inability to express it, to press it out as pus from a wound, or, more pertinently, as microbes from buboes.
To some interpreters, this combination suggests that the Philistines had bubonic plague, and were sending symbols of their buboes and of the rodent carriers of the disease.
He observed what precautions he could, and to ease pain he lanced the distended buboes.
Despite elucidating the basic symptoms one would expect to see with bubonic plague, such as fever, buboes, and vomiting, Biraben never justified how he came to identify certain localities in certain years as experiencing plagues in his own data set, and a structural overview of the original sources he used is missing.
Inguinal bubo syndrome characteristically presents with 1 or more papules or ulcers in the inguinal region, accompanied by unilateral and bilateral lymphadenopathy, called buboes (95).
Characterised by buboes (large swellings in the lymph nodes) and high fever, it is thought four out of five who contracted the plague died within eight days.
Another set defiantly masks the buboes in their narrative in order to avoid detection" as plague-inspired utopian fiction (8).
Plague bacteria can break out of the buboes and be carried by the blood stream to the lungs and cause a variant of plague that is spread by contaminated droplets from the cough of patients (pneumonic plague).
Later, it officially became known as the bubonic plague, after the buboes, or lumps that erupted on victims' skin.