Brugia malayi


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Bru·gi·a ma·la·yi

the Malayan filaria species, an important agent of human filariasis and elephantiasis in Southeast Asia and Indonesia, transmitted to humans by species of Mansonia and Anopheles mosquitoes; adult parasites cause lymphangitis and lymphadenitis, but with less involvement of the genital region and lower limbs, and a relatively greater incidence of disease in the upper limbs than with Wuchereria bancrofti infection. Formerly called Wuchereriamalayi.

Brugia malayi

A roundworm (nematode), the microfilaria of which primarily inhabit blood vessels and lymphatics—where it causes lymphatic microfilariasis—as well as in muscle, connective tissue and serous cavities.

Epidemiology
Brugian filariasis is primarily a disease of rural South East Asia, infecting ±13 million in the region. It is transmitted by Mansonia, Anopheles and Aedes mosquitos, which serve as both vector and intermediate host.

Brugia malayi

(broo'ja mah-la'-i)
A filarial parasitic worm that can invade lymphatics and cause massive swelling of the scrotum or of the lower extremities. The latter condition is called elephantiasis. See: elephantiasis; Wuchereria
References in periodicals archive ?
Elephantiasis is caused by a variety of roundworms (filarial worms to be precise), which include Wucherereria bancrofti which causes almost 90 per cent of cases while Brugia malayi accounts for most of the remaining 10 per cent.
In an experiment with rodents (Mastomys coucha) the crude extract from stem of Lantana by oral route shows antifilarial efficacy (Mishra et al., 2007) by killing 40% of adult Brugia malayi parasites and sterilizing three fourth of the female worms.
DIM-1 es altamente conservada a nivel de aminoacidos con su homologo en nematodos como Caenorhabditis briggsae (99%), Brugia malayi (77%) y Ascaris suum (77%).
An annotated reference Wolbachia genome was obtained from New England Biolabs (http://tools.neb.com/wolbachia, originating from infection of Brugia malayi; Foster et al.
[1] It is caused by lymphatic dwelling nematodes namely Wuchereria bancrofti, Brugia malayi and Brugia timori, and transmitted by the bite of infective mosquitoes.
Species Name Specimen Vector Collection Site Count Status Description Aedes (Hul.) 13 WNV Fire tub, japonicus cemetery urn, (Theobald, 1901) rock hole Aedes (Stg.) 127 DENV, CHIKV, Bamboo stump, albopictus ZIKV bamboo vase, (Skuse, 1894) concrete tub, creek, pan, iron kettle bombed area, cemetery urn, wooden tub Aedes (Tan.) togoi 149 JEV Bamboo stump, (Theobald, 1907) bucket, cement tank, ditch, fire tub, rock hole, tank in bombed area, wooden barrel Anopheles (Ano.) 15 Cement tank, koreicus Yamada seepage pool and Watanabe, 1918 Anopheles (Ano.) 31 Brugia malayi Ditch, grassy sinensis s.l.
Given their role in health and disease, it is no surprise that they have a relevant role in the pathogenesis of filariasis caused by the lymphatic-dwelling nematodes Wuchereria bancrofti, Brugia malayi, and B.
Mouse infection with Brugia malayi (a filarial nematode that belongs to the order Spirurida, superfamily Filarioidea) also induces AAMs that strongly suppress T cell proliferation and have tissue repair functions [61, 62].
Lymphatic filariasis (LF) is a disease of considerable socio-economic burden in the tropics and sub-tropics and is caused by Wuchereria bancrofti, Brugia malayi and B.
The major offending organisms in lymphatic filariasis are Wuchereria bancrofti and Brugia malayi or Brugia timori.
Several types of parasitic roundworms have iPGM, including Brugia malayi and Onchocerca volvulus, which infect roughly 150 million people living mostly in tropical regions.