Brufen


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ibuprofen

Actiprofen Caplets (CA), Advil, Advil Extra Strength (CA), Advil Migraine, Advil Pediatric Drops, Anadin Ibuprofen (UK), Anadin Ultra (UK), Apo-Ibuprofen (CA), Arthrofen (UK), Brufen (UK), Caldolor, Calprofen (UK), Children's Advil, Children's Motrin, Cuprofen (UK), Extra Strength Motrin IB (CA), Hedex Ibuprofen (UK), Ibugel (UK), Ibuleve (UK), Ibumousse (UK), Ibuspray (UK), Junior Strength Advil, Junior Strength Motrin, Motrin, Motrin IB, Motrin Infant, NeoProfen, Novo-Profen, Nu-Ibuprofen (CA), Nurofen (UK), PMS-Ibuprofen (CA)

Pharmacologic class: Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)

Therapeutic class: Analgesic, antipyretic, anti-inflammatory

Pregnancy risk category B (third trimester: D)

FDA Box Warning

• Drug may increase risk of serious cardiovascular thrombotic events, myocardial infarction, and stroke. Risk may increase with duration of use, and may be greater in patients who have cardiovascular disease or risk factors for it.

• Drug is contraindicated for perioperative pain in setting of coronary artery bypass graft surgery.

• Drug increases risk of serious GI adverse events, including bleeding, ulcers, and stomach or intestinal perforation, which can be fatal. These events can occur at any time during therapy and without warning. Elderly patients are at greater risk.

Action

Unknown. Thought to inhibit cyclooxygenase, an enzyme needed for prostaglandin synthesis.

Availability

Capsules (liquigels): 200 mg

Injection: 400 mg/4-ml, 800 mg/8-ml vials

Oral suspension: 100 mg/5 ml

Pediatric drops: 50 mg/1.25 ml

Tablets: 100 mg, 200 mg, 400 mg, 600 mg, 800 mg

Tablets (chewable): 50 mg, 100 mg

Indications and dosages

Rheumatoid arthritis; osteoarthritis

Adults: 1.2 to 3.2 g/day P.O. in three to four divided doses

Mild to moderate pain

Adults: 400 mg P.O. q 4 to 6 hours p.r.n. or 400 to 800 mg I.V. over 30 minutes q 6 hours, as necessary

Moderate to severe pain as adjunct to opioid analgesics

Adults: 400 to 800 mg I.V. over 30 minutes q 6 hours, as necessary

Fever reduction

Adults: 400 mg I.V. over 30 minutes, followed by 400 mg P.O. q 4 to 6 hours or 100 to 200 mg P.O. q 4 hours as necessary

Primary dysmenorrhea

Adults: 400 mg P.O. q 4 hours p.r.n.

Juvenile arthritis

Children: 30 to 40 mg/kg/day P.O. in three or four divided doses. Daily dosages above 50 mg/kg aren't recommended.

Fever reduction; pain relief

Children ages 6 to 12: 5 mg/kg P.O. if temperature is below 102.5 °F (39.2 °C) or 10 mg/kg if temperature is above 102.5 °F. Maximum daily dosage is 40 mg/kg.

Off-label uses

• Migraine and tension headaches

Contraindications

• Hypersensitivity to drug or other NSAIDs

• Perioperative use in coronary artery bypass graft surgery

Precautions

Use cautiously in:

• severe cardiovascular, renal, or hepatic disease; GI disease; asthma; chronic alcohol use

• elderly patients

• pregnant (avoid use after 30 weeks' gestation) or breastfeeding patients

• children younger than age 17 (safety and efficacy not established).

Administration

• Ideally, give oral form 1 hour before or 2 hours after meal. If GI upset occurs, give with meals.

• Be aware that patients must be well hydrated before I.V. form is administered.

• Dilute injection form before administering.

Adverse reactions

CNS: headache, dizziness, drowsiness, nervousness, aseptic meningitis

CV: hypertension, arrhythmias

EENT: amblyopia, blurred vision, tinnitus

GI: nausea, vomiting, constipation, dyspepsia, abdominal discomfort, GI bleeding

GU: cystitis, hematuria, azotemia, renal failure

Hematologic: anemia, prolonged bleeding time, aplastic anemia, neutropenia, pancytopenia, thrombocytopenia, leukopenia, agranulocytosis

Hepatic: hepatitis

Metabolic: hyperglycemia, hypoglycemia

Respiratory: bronchospasm

Skin: rash, pruritus, urticaria, Stevens-Johnson syndrome

Other: edema, allergic reactions including anaphylaxis

Interactions

Drug-drug. Antihypertensives, diuretics: decreased efficacy of these drugs

Aspirin and other NSAIDs, corticosteroids: additive adverse GI effects

Cefamandole, cefoperazone, cefotetan, drugs affecting platelet function (including abciximab, clopidogrel, eptifibatide, ticlopidine, tirofiban), plicamycin, thrombolytics, valproic acid, warfarin: increased risk of bleeding

Cyclosporine: increased risk of nephrotoxicity

Digoxin: slightly increased digoxin blood level

Lithium: increased lithium blood level, greater risk of lithium toxicity

Methotrexate: increased risk of methotrexate toxicity

Probenecid: increased risk of ibuprofen toxicity

Drug-diagnostic tests. Alanine aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, aspartate aminotransferase, blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, lactate dehydrogenase, potassium: increased values

Bleeding time: prolonged

Creatinine clearance, glucose, hematocrit, hemoglobin, platelets, white blood cells: decreased values

Drug-herbs. Anise, arnica, chamomile, clove, dong quai, fenugreek, feverfew, garlic, ginger, ginkgo, ginseng, licorice: increased risk of bleeding

White willow: additive adverse GI effects

Drug-behaviors. Alcohol use: additive adverse GI effects

Sun exposure: phototoxicity

Patient monitoring

• Monitor for desired effect.

• Watch for GI upset, adverse CNS effects (such as headache and drowsiness), and hypersensitivity reaction.

• Stay alert for GI bleeding and ulcers, especially in long-term therapy.

• In long-term therapy, assess renal and hepatic function regularly.

• Monitor blood pressure closely during treatment.

Patient teaching

• Tell patient to take oral drug with full glass of water, with food, or after meals to minimize GI upset.

• To help prevent esophageal irritation, instruct patient to avoid lying down for 30 to 60 minutes after taking dose.

Instruct patient to immediately report irregular heartbeats, black tarry stools, vision changes, unusual tiredness, yellowing of skin or eyes, change in urination pattern, difficulty breathing, finger or ankle swelling, weight gain, itching, rash, fever, or sore throat.

• Caution patient to avoid driving and other hazardous activities until he knows how drug affects concentration, alertness, and balance.

• As appropriate, review all other significant and life-threatening adverse reactions and interactions, especially those related to the drugs, tests, herbs, and behaviors mentioned above.

Brufen

A brand name for IBUPROFEN.
References in periodicals archive ?
"The (SMC) doctor said I probably just had a bruise, so he gave me Brufen," said the athlete on condition of anonymity.
"We have contacted the manufacturer of Brufen to confirm the inaccuracy of these rumours," he added.
Prolonged use of paracetamol can prove fatal due to the damage caused to the liver, whereas brufen can result in renal failure, elevation in blood pressure and gastrointestinal bleeding.
Brufen of Abbott Laboratories Pakistan Ltd has a 12% value share in 2015, thanks to its increasing popularity with doctors.
No disprin or brufen should be given as it can cause further lowering of platelet count and one should not let platelet count fall below 10,000 as this can be dangerous.
Sixty patients in group A received Lornoxicam and patients in group B were given Ibuprofen (Brufen) one hour before the IANB.
Figure--2: Most Common Medicines Taken as Self-Medication by Medical Students 1st Year 2nd Year Paracetamol 39 59 Vicks Action 500 20 14 B-Complex 16 12 Folic Acid 14 19 Avil 11 2 Brufen 11 19 D Cold Tablet 11 4 Cetrizine 6 25 Azithromycin 4 19 Note: Table made from bar graph.
The Health department has recommended the following preventive measures for general public: Dont keep stagnant water in utensils especially in and around the shady areas and houses, use of mosquitoes nets, prevent collection of stagnant water in and around your house, use mosquitoes repellents all over your body when moving outdoors, use full sleeves shirt and full length shalwar and pants, fixation of fine wire mesh screens on windows and doors, use of coil and mats while indoor, in case of fever please immediately approach/visit the nearby hospital and avoid taking aspirin and brufen tablets.
Q I TAKE Brufen and paracetamol for relief from osteoarthritis in my knee.
But the issue is that a doctor has to sign for paracetamol or brufen. Nurses can give their children paracetamol at home, but when they are in uniform they are not allowed to give paracetamol That's a nonsense.
Supply of Cap Anti-Oxidant, Cap B Complex+ Vit C + Zjnc(Zevit), Cap Gabapentin 300mg, Cap Ibruprofen400mg+Tizanidine Hydrochloride2mg (Brufen MR), Cap Omeprazole20mg +Domperidone 10mg, Cap Pregabalin 75 mg, Cap Rabeprazole 20mg, Cap Rifampicin 450 + Isonex 300 Mg, Cap Vit E 400mg, E/D Tavaprost bott of 5ml, E/D Timolol + Dorzalamide, E/D( Sodium carboxy Methyl Cellulose, Fluticasone Propionate 50mcg (100 Metered doses) Flomist Nasal Spray, Inh Baclomethasone 200mg, Inh Budesonide 200 meg, Inh Duolin (lpratopium+ Levosulbutamol), Inh Fluticasone 200metered doses, Inh Formeterol + Budesonide (Forocort).
All patients were given Tab Ibuprofen(Brufen) 400mg and Cap Doxycycline (Vibramycin)100mg half hour before MVA.