Brown Syndrome

ten·don sheath syn·drome

limited elevation of the eye in adduction, appearing clinically as a paresis of the inferior oblique muscle, due to fascia contracting the superior oblique muscle on the same side.

ten·don sheath syn·drome

limited elevation of the eye in adduction, appearing clinically as a paresis of the inferior oblique muscle, due to fascia contracting the superior oblique muscle on the same side.
Neurology
(1) A condition characterised by congenital analgesia with neurogenic anhidrosis, loss of deep and superficial pain sensation, dental dysplasia, meningeal thickening with cystic degeneration, hyperreflexia, mild mental retardation
Lab Abnormal HVA and VMA assays
(2) A rare idiopathic neurologic disorder of insidious onset, characterised primarily by sensorineural deafness and progressive paralysis of the muscles of the face, neck, shoulders and limbs that often ends in respiratory failure
Ophthalmology Restriction or loss of ability to elevate the eye in adduction, often associated with down-turning of the affected eye, a compensatory tilt of the head associated with congenital fibrosis and shortening of the anterior sheath of the superior oblique tendon of the trochlear muscle
Aetiology Idiopathic or associated with inflammation, possibly related to forceps delivery
Treatment Surgical

Brown,

Harold Whaley, U.S. ophthalmologist, 1898–.
Brown syndrome - limited elevation of the eye in adduction due to fascia contracting the superior oblique muscle on the same side. Synonym(s): tendon sheath syndrome
Paterson-Brown-Kelly syndrome - see under Paterson

Brown,

Jason W., U.S. physician.
Brown syndrome - syndrome occurring in individuals with light complexion, blond hair, light eyes and characterized by loss of pain sensitivity, pupillary abnormalities, neurogenic anhidrosis, vasomotor instability. Synonym(s): neural crest syndrome
References in periodicals archive ?
Every patient was categorized into one of the six groups: esotropia, exotropia, intermittent type, paralytic strabismus, Brown syndrome and Duane Refraction Syndrome (DRS).
The prevalence of exotropia, esotropia, intermittent, paralytic strabismus, Brown syndrome and Duane Refraction
In the year 2014, 10 cases (90.9%) had DRS and only 1 case (9.09%) had Brown syndrome. In 2015, 11 cases (73.3%) reported with DRS and 4 cases (26.6%) with Brown syndrome.
In our study, brown syndrome was present in 81.9% cases and Duane refraction syndrome was present in 18.03 % cases from the year 2014 to 2018.
The most common causes of AHP were determined as fourth cranial nerve palsy (33.7%), Duane retraction syndrome (21.5%), sixth cranial nerve palsy (11%), nystagmus blockage syndrome (9.8%) and Brown syndrome (6.7%).
The most common diagnoses in patients with AHP were fourth nerve palsy (33.7%), Duane retraction syndrome (21.5%), sixth nerve palsy (11%), nystagmus blockage syndrome (9.8%), and Brown syndrome (6.7%).
In the same study, the most common causes of incomitance were identified as A-V pattern, fourth nerve palsy, asymmetric surgery, Duane retraction syndrome, and Brown syndrome. (8) Incomitant strabismus was also a prominent cause of ocular AHP in the present study, and the five most common causes were fourth nerve palsy (33.7%), Duane retraction syndrome (21.5%), sixth nerve palsy (11%), nystagmus blockage syndrome (9.8%), and Brown syndrome (6.7%).
He said the revelation of "anti Catholic and anti-Christian" messages on the roof "suggests that the Dan Brown syndrome has struck again."
Cowboy suffers from the Craig Brown syndrome the fans don't pick the team, it's my team, you're no' playing.
The surgical treatment of traumatic Brown syndrome. J Pediatr Ophthalmol Strabismus.
It's becoming accepted that Labour is suffering from what could be called Craig Brown syndrome.