Andropogon

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Related to Broomsedge: Andropogon virginicus

Andropogon

a large genus of grasses in the family Poaceae. A volunteer in naive pasture in many countries. Palatable when young. Makes good meadow hay. Called also bluestem, bluesedge, turkeyfoot.
References in periodicals archive ?
Typical perennial grasses include broomsedges (Andropogon virginicus and its allies) and locally Muhlenbergia capillaris.
Odum [7] found the distribution of cotton rats to be associated with broomsedge (Andropogon virginicus) and the broomsedge-shrub stage of succession.
Competitive responses of loblolly pine to gradients in loblolly, sweetgum and broomsedge densities.
Even if she worked her unhappiness into the soil; even if she cut down and burned it off with the broomsedge, it would still spring up again in the place where it had been.
roadsides with moderate-to-dense grassy cover; heavy stands of broomsedge and weeds associated with scattered stands of woody vegetation) yet still be suitable for this species (Schmidly 1983).
Structure and function of an old-field broomsedge community.
and cutgrass (Leersia hexandra); (2) cypress savannas with fine sandy soil underlain by a layer of clay, with a relatively open pond cypress (Taxodium ascendens) canopy and an understory of panic grasses and broomsedge (Andropogon virginicus); and (3) cypress/gum swamps with thick organic soils and a dense overstory of pond cypress and swamp tupelo (Nyssa biflora) with virtually no understory or midstory vegetation (Kirkman et al.
The vegetation was dominated by broomsedge bluestem and only a few isolated trees (red cedars) were evident.
32) Other examples: "the colour of the broomsedge was overrunning the desolate hidden field of her life" (p.
Her obsessive effort to achieve "final obliteration" of the phallic broomsedge betrays an anxiety that the woman writer's success is always tenuous in the face of ever-threatening phallic intrusion; it is- only, she fears, "[a] few cultivated acres in the midst of an encroaching waste land
As Judy Smith Murr states, Queenborough represents, like the broomsedge in Barren Ground, sterility and paralysis.