bromine

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bromine

 (Br) [bro´mēn]
a chemical element, atomic number 35, atomic weight 79.909. (See Appendix 6.)
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

bro·mine (Br),

(brō'mēn, -min),
A nonmetallic, reddish, volatile, liquid element; atomic no. 35, atomic wt. 79.904; valences 1-7, inclusive; it unites with hydrogen to form hydrobromic acid, and this reacts with many metals to form bromides, some of which are used in medicine.
[Fr. brome, bromine, fr. G. bromos, stench]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

bromine

Chemistry
A halide element (atomic number 35, atomic weight 79.9), a deep reddish-brown liquid that emits a brownish vapour at room temperature, present in minute quantities in sea water and in some saline springs. 

Medical history
A bromide compound commonly used as a sedative in the 19th century.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

bro·mine

(Br) (brō'mēn)
A nonmetallic, reddish, volatile, liquid element; atomic no. 35, atomic wt. 79.904; valences 1-7, inclusive; it unites with hydrogen to form hydrobromic acid, and this reacts with many metals to form bromides, some of which are used in medicine.
[Fr. brome, bromine, fr. G. bromos, stench]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

bro·mine

(Br) (brō'mēn)
A nonmetallic, reddish, volatile, liquid element; unites with hydrogen to form hydrobromic acid, and this reacts with many metals to form bromides, some of which are used in medicine.
[Fr. brome, bromine, fr. G. bromos, stench]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
There has been some concern, particularly in Europe, over certain bromine compounds. However, the European Union Commission as recently as October 2005 has exempted commercial "decabrom" from its Restriction of Hazardous Substances (RoHS) because, after hundreds of studies, decabrom has been found to pose no harm to human health.
Demand for potassium bromide will grow below the derivatives average, as demand for photographic chemicals, its principal market, decelerates and as it faces growing competition from lower priced bromine compounds such as sodium bromide which can replace it in some applications.
DSM is now exploring the synergy of melamine with other flame retardants, including bromine compounds.
The stratosphere over all regions except the tropics has lost a few percent of its ozone since 1979 - a trend also attributed by scientists to chlorine and bromine compounds.
Regarding the latter, Shaw recommends Flamtard S for use with chlorinated paraffins instead of bromine compounds. (CIRCLE 45)