bromide

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bromide

 [bro´mīd]
any binary compound of bromine. Bromides produce depression of the central nervous system, and were once widely used for their sedative effect; because overdosage causes serious mental disturbances they are now seldom used, except occasionally in grand mal seizures. See also bromism.

bro·mide

(brō'mīd),
The anion Br-; salt of hydrogen bromide (HBr); several salts formerly used as sedatives, hypnotics, and anticonvulsants.

bromide

/bro·mide/ (bro´mīd) any binary compound of bromine in which the bromine carries a negative charge (Br−); specifically a salt (or organic ester) of hydrobromic acid (H+Br−).

bromide

[brō′mīd]
Etymology: Gk, bromos, stench
an anion of bromine. Bromide salts, once widely prescribed as sedatives, are now seldom used for that purpose because they may cause serious mental disturbances as side effects.

bromide

An chemical compound containing a bromine ion Br-; once used as a hypnotic and sedative and for headaches—e.g., Bromo-Seltzer. It was withdrawn from human use in 1975 due to chronic toxicity. It is of current interest as an industrial toxin—e.g., methyl bromide, which is used as a solvent, degreaser and fumigant.

bro·mide

(brō'mīd)
The anion Br-; salt of hydrogen bromide (HBr); several salts formerly used as sedatives, hypnotics, and anticonvulsants.

bromide

any binary compound of bromine. Bromides produce depression of the central nervous system, and were once widely used for their sedative effect. Potassium bromide is used in the treatment of intractable epilepsy. See also brominism.
References in periodicals archive ?
Calcium bromide is not generally regarded as corrosive and is still widely used in the North Sea, but Reuters uncovered a number of historical cases in which chemically related fluids known as halides, such as zinc bromide and calcium chloride, have corroded pipework.
If the steels used are susceptible to chloride cracking, they will also be at risk of bromide cracking," says Paul Rostron, professor of corrosion chemistry at the Petroleum Institute in the United Arab Emirates.
Zinc bromide is also known to be increasingly corrosive at high temperatures and its use is banned in the North Sea because it is regarded as dangerous.