takotsubo cardiomyopathy

(redirected from Broken heart syndrome)
Also found in: Acronyms.
A non-ischaemic cardiomyopathy most common in post-menopausal women, which is characterised by a sudden temporary weakening of the myocardium triggered by physical or emotional stress—e.g., death of a loved one—hence the alternate term, broken heart syndrome
Pathogenesis High serum catecholamines—adrenaline/ epinephrine
Diagnosis Negative coronary angiogram
Prognosis If the individual survives the initial event, the left ventricular function improves within 2 months
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

takotsubo cardiomyopathy

Reversible dysfunction of the left ventricle. It may be the cause of transient heart failure that occurs after exceptionally stressful events. The heart in such instances takes on a rounded shape with a narrow neck, resembling a traditional Japanese lobster trap (takotsubo). It is informally called broken-heart syndrome.
Synonym: apical ballooning syndrome; stress-induced cardiomyopathy; transient left ventricular apical ballooning
See also: cardiomyopathy
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
Also known as broken heart syndrome, it weakens the left ventricle, the heart's main pumping chamber, and is usually caused by severe stress.
Broken heart syndrome causes sudden intense chest pain and shortness of breath that can be mistaken for a heart attack.
Also known as takotsubo syndrome - referring to the shape of the heart in people with this condition, which resembles a Japanese pot with the same name - broken heart syndrome can be brought on by shock.
Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TCM) or stress-induced cardiomyopathy or "broken heart syndrome" is a transient cardiac syndrome that was first described in Japan in 1990 by Sato et al.
Ironically, she would become a victim of "Broken Heart Syndrome." What then is such an entity?
SCIENTISTS are to explore for the first time the long-term effects of so-called "broken heart syndrome".
Huddersfield consultant cardiologist Dr Jeremy Butts explained that broken heart syndrome can occur during highly stressful or emotional times, such as a painful break-up, the death of a spouse, the loss of a job or extreme anger.
Murray Hart, Clinical Nurse Specialist in the Intensive Care Unit at Christchurch Public Hospital, gave an informative presentation entitled 'Broken Heart Syndrome' or 'Takotsubo cardiomyopathy' post the Christchurch earthquakes.
Keywords: Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, Broken Heart Syndrome.
The pain of a broken heart feels all too real, and there may be a reason for that: broken heart syndrome. Also known as stress cardiomyopathy, it causes a weakening of the left ventricle, the heart's main pumping chamber.
But early next morning after filming the harrowing scene, she collapsed at home and was rushed to A&E with what doctors told her was "broken heart syndrome" - often suffered by people who experience intense grief and loss in real life.