broadside

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broadside

A separately published piece of paper, usually printed on one side and intended to be read unfolded, which is posted, publicly distributed or sold—e.g., proclamations, handbills, newsheets.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Such areas as courts, jails, and asylums, or conditions like indenture, transportation, and impressment represent spheres of institutional control, and their respective landscapes are ubiquitous in the broadside ballads, often serving a narrative function equivalent to the liminal, transitional outland; that is, they constitute places of testing, of turmoil, and of temporary or permanent separation.
Livingston, British Broadside Ballads of the Sixteenth Century: A Catalogue of the Extant Sheets and an Essay (New York: Garland, 1991): twenty-five out of 267 distinct broadsides, or 9.4 per cent.
(6.) I use the term ballad in reference to those songs that tell a story; this category includes the Child ballads (those collected by Francis James Child), British broadside ballads, and American ballads either newly composed or based on English models.
examined: Martin Graebe demonstrates Sabine Baring-Gould's changing attitude to and increasing appreciation of the role of printed ballads; while Chris Wright avers that many Scottish collectors of folk songs deprecated and neglected broadside ballads as a source, and that the singers themselves picked up and reflected this bias.
Kelley, 1970); Henry Mayhew, London Labour and the London Poor (1861; New York: Dover, 1963); Shepard, History of Street Literature; John Pitts, Ballad Printer; and The Broadside Ballad; and Hepburn, A Book of Scattered Leaves.
Simpson, The British Broadside Ballad and its Musk- (New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press, 1966), pp, 434-37.
The immediate impetus for Ballads and Broadsides in Britain 1500-1800 was 'Straws in the Wind', a two-day conference held in Santa Barbara in 2006, which in turn celebrated the wonderful English Broadside Ballad Archive (EBBA), which already offers all the Pepys Ballads online in highly accessible formats and is busy adding sheets from the Roxburghe collection.
Lucy Broadwood declined the option of searching out and adding the missing stanzas, even when the song was obviously a broadside ballad and the full text was available in the British Museum.
Paradoxically, the dichotomy between high and low culture is personified by the musician of Barlow's title and a Hogarth print: a professional violin player of the Italian opera whose practice is interrupted by the pandemonium in the street below his room from the cries of vendors, the playing of an itinerant oboist and a drummer boy, and the singing of a woman who is trying to sell copies of a broadside ballad, 'The Lady's Fall'.
Simpson's The British Broadside Ballad and its Music (1966), where the interested reader may find a lengthier discussion of some points; for instance, what was the tune of 'The Great Boobee'?
He points to two main factors: the dissolution of the monasteries, which produced a flood of unemployed ex-clerics, too many of whom became itinerant singers; and the invention of the printing press, which made possible the broadside ballad. Minstrels were suddenly de trop, and, in accordance with the law of supply and demand, the payments they received for their services plummeted in real terms, once the high rate of inflation in Tudor England is taken into account.