empiricism

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Related to British empiricism: Continental Rationalism

em·pir·i·cism

(em-pir'i-sizm),
A looking to experience as a guide to practice or to the therapeutic use of any remedy.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

empiricism

(ĕm-pîr′ĭ-sĭz′əm)
n.
1. The view that experience, especially of the senses, is the only source of knowledge.
2.
a. Employment of empirical methods, as in science.
b. An empirical conclusion.
3. The practice of medicine that disregards scientific theory and relies solely on practical experience.

em·pir′i·cist n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

empiricism

The belief that knowledge or behaviour stems from experience, learning or data acquired by observation or experimentation. See nativism; empiricist theory.
Millodot: Dictionary of Optometry and Visual Science, 7th edition. © 2009 Butterworth-Heinemann

em·pir·i·cism

(em-pir'i-sizm)
Using experience as a guide to practice or use of any remedy.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
It is truly a monumental task in our day to convince any child of Descartes or British empiricism that even an open attitude toward various philosophical outlooks is measured by the realism that they are unable to jettison.
His topics include mathematical probability and demographic prediction, British empiricism and shop arithmetic, Queen Anne's bounty, political arithmetic, and wobbles and perturbations.
Offering a broad and efficient introduction to what he calls the "economy of salvation" in Austen, the first chapter argues for Austen's novels through the prisms of neoclassical hermeneutics, British empiricism (primarily through Locke), and a rapidly changing unregulated capitalist society.
The roots of such an approach can be traced through Marx to Utilitarianism and eventually to British Empiricism. Romantic metaphysics itself arose in part as a response to Empiricism and was nothing if not political.
To illustrate, once the polarity principle is applied to the Grand Debate between British empiricism and Continental rationalism, it necessarily follows that their respective methodological concepts of sense experience and reason are no longer to be treated partially as separate cognitive criteria at interminable war with each other, but, instead, as complementary phases of the same basic method of natural science, without which no reliable knowledge of nature is possible.
British empiricism, in its denial of evidence for the existence of God, deprived religion of its rational foundation, leaving religion on intellectual shaky ground, with consequences in the moral and social orders.
Norton appears strongly influenced by positivism and British empiricism, presenting the opinions of some authors that might otherwise be viewed as simple professions of faith as cant and bombast.

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