empiricism

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Related to British empiricism: Continental Rationalism

em·pir·i·cism

(em-pir'i-sizm),
A looking to experience as a guide to practice or to the therapeutic use of any remedy.

empiricism

/em·pir·i·cism/ (em-pir´ĭ-sizm) skill or knowledge based entirely on experience.empir´icempir´ical

empiricism

(ĕm-pîr′ĭ-sĭz′əm)
n.
1. The view that experience, especially of the senses, is the only source of knowledge.
2.
a. Employment of empirical methods, as in science.
b. An empirical conclusion.
3. The practice of medicine that disregards scientific theory and relies solely on practical experience.

em·pir′i·cist n.

empiricism

[empir′isiz′əm]
a form of therapy based on the therapist's personal experience and that of other practitioners. empiricist, n.

empiricism,

n philosophical school in which theories must be based upon repeatable observations. Modern science has empiricism as its philosophical foundation.

empiricism

The belief that knowledge or behaviour stems from experience, learning or data acquired by observation or experimentation. See nativism; empiricist theory.

em·pir·i·cism

(em-pir'i-sizm)
Using experience as a guide to practice or use of any remedy.

empiricism

skill or knowledge based entirely on experience; compare with rationalism.
References in periodicals archive ?
His topics include mathematical probability and demographic prediction, British empiricism and shop arithmetic, Queen Anne's bounty, political arithmetic, and wobbles and perturbations.
His consistency in subjecting the novels to thorough and almost microscopic analysis "according to the logic of British Empiricism, the morality of Georgian Anglicanism, and the imperatives of unregulated capitalism" (187), a phrase he repeats many times, is admirable, but one wishes for less defensiveness in methodology.
Norton appears strongly influenced by positivism and British empiricism, presenting the opinions of some authors that might otherwise be viewed as simple professions of faith as cant and bombast.
For instance, Peirce's withering critiques of the method of Descartes and the spirit of Cartesianism in "Questions Concerning Certain Faculties Claimed for Man" (1868) and "Some Consequences of Four Incapacities" (1868) enable Smyth's lucid discussion of Peirce reading the debate on intuition that divided the tradition of classical British empiricism (John Locke, James Mill, John Stuart Mill, Alexander Bain, and Peirce's Harvard professor Francis Bowen) and Thomas Reid's commonsensism combined with elements of Kantianism (Sir William Hamilton, Victor Cousin, Henry Mansel, James McCosh).
The book clearly underlines how Deleuze understood the issue of becoming in the framework of British empiricism.
Traditional British empiricism supposed there was a real, mind-independent external world which is discovered but not constructed by the subject.
Three movements are singled out: (1) the rise of irrationalism and individualism as themes of eighteenth-century thought; (2) the influence of British empiricism on aesthetic theory; and (3) the continental aesthetic tradition as represented, for example, by Mendelssohn, Baumgarten, and Tetens.

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