British Pharmacopoeia

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Pharmacopeia

, Pharmacopoeia (far'mă-kō-pē'ă),
A work containing monographs of therapeutic agents, standards for their strength and purity, and their formulations. The various national pharmacopeias are referred to by abbreviations, of which the following are the most frequently encountered: USP, the Pharmacopeia of the United States of America (United States Pharmacopeia); BP, British Pharmacopoeia; Codex medicamentarius, the French Pharmacopeia; I.C. Add. (or BA), the Indian and Colonial Addendum to the BP; IP, International Pharmacopeia; Pharmacopeia Austr., the Austrian Pharmacopeia; Ph.G., the German Pharmacopeia (D.A.B.); Pharmacopeia Helv., the Swiss Pharmacopeia. The first edition of the USP was compiled in 1820 and was made a legal standard by the terms of the National Food and Drugs Act in January 1907.
[G. pharmakopoiia, fr. pharmakon, a medicine, + poieo, to make]
References in periodicals archive ?
[1] British Pharmacopoeia, British Pharmacopoeia Commission, Renouf Publishing Company Limited, UK, 2013.
Produced by the British Pharmacopoeia Commission Secretariat of the Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency, the BP makes an important contribution to public health by setting publicly available standards for the quality of medicines.Since 1864, the BP has been providing authoritative standards for medicinal products and pharmaceutical substances and it continues to play an important role in the standard-setting process worldwide.
Monographs for ginkgo raw materials (leaf and extract) can be found in various pharmacopoeias, including the United States Pharmacopoeia-National Formulary (USP-NF) (United States Pharmacopeial Convention, 2013), the European Pharmacopoeia (EP) and the British Pharmacopoeia (BP) (British Pharmacopoeia Commission, 2012).
Heparin BP is expressed in International Units (IU) and manufactured according to the standard assay methods described in the British Pharmacopoeia (British Pharmacopoeia Commission Secretariat, 2001) and those specified by the European Pharmacopoeia (European Pharmacopoeia Commission, 1992).

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