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bridge

 [brij]
1. a fixed partial denture; see illustration.
A bridge unit serves to restore a functional unit by replacing one or more missing teeth. A fixed bridge consists of abutment and pontic teeth splinted together. From Darby and Walsh, 1995.
2. a protoplasmic structure uniting adjacent elements of a cell, similar in plants and animals.
conjugative bridge in bacterial conjugation, a connection formed between two bacterial cells by the attachment of an F pilus from an F+ cell to an F cell.
disulfide bridge disulfide bond.

bridge

(brij),
1. The upper part of the ridge of the nose formed by the nasal bones.
2. One of the threads of protoplasm that appear to pass from one cell to another.
3. Synonym(s): fixed partial denture

bridge

(brĭj)
n.
1.
a. The upper bony ridge of the human nose.
b. The part of a pair of eyeglasses that rests against this ridge.
2. A fixed or removable replacement for one or several but not all of the natural teeth, usually anchored at each end to a natural tooth.
3. Chemistry An intramolecular connection that spans atoms or groups of atoms.

bridge′a·ble adj.

BRIDGE

Beta Radiation Investigation With Direct Stenting and Galileo in Europe. A study which evaluated intracoronary 32P radiation and the Galileo Radiotherapy System after direct Multi-Link Rx Tetra coronary stenting.
 
Conclusion
32P intravascular brachytherapy reduces in-stent neointimal proliferation and restenosis; thrombosis was a major problem.

bridge

Dentistry A fixed partial denture; a prosthetic replacement of missing teeth cemented or attached to abutment teeth or implants adjacent to the space; removable partial denture is a prosthetic replacement of missing teeth on a framework that can be removed by a Pt Physical therapy An exercise in which a person lays on his/her back with bended knees, while lifting the pelvis, placing thighs, back and pelvis in a straight line, strengthening abdominal, lower back, gluteus and hamstring muscles Transplantation medicine An organ surrogate that carries out a particular physiologic function and “buys time” for a Pt awaiting a donor organ for transplantation

bridge

(brij)
1. The upper part of the ridge of the nose formed by the nasal bones.
2. One of the threads of protoplasm that appear to pass from one cell to another.
3. Synonym(s): fixed partial denture.

bridge

(brij)
1. The upper part of the external nose formed by the junction of the nasal bones.
2. The curved part of a pair of eyeglasses that rests on the bridge of the nose.
3. A narrow band of tissue.
4. A cast dental restoration that replaces missing teeth. The restoration is usually made of gold alloy, with or without a porcelain exterior, and is attached to adjacent or abutment teeth for support.
4. The use of a short-acting drug when treatment with a longer-acting drug must be temporarily interrupted or during the initiation of the long-acting drug before it reaches full therapeutic effectiveness.

Patient care

Bridging is commonly used for perioperative anticoagulation. In patients who have atrial fibrillation or a history of blood clotting, warfarin, which has a relatively long half-life, is withheld several days before surgery. The bridge consists of the administration of low-molecular-weight heparins (LMWHs), which have a shorter half-life, until about 12 hr before the procedure in order to prevent clotting. At a safe time after the operation, LMWHs are reinstituted until warfarin reaches therapeutic levels, e.g., an international normalized ratio of 2 or more. The duration of bridging therapy varies but is typically between 2 days and 1 week.

Enlarge picture
BRIDGING
5. An exercise for activating the abdominal and hip extensor muscles. The patient lies on his back with knees flexed and feet flat against a horizontal surface, such as a floor, bed, or plinth (treatment table). The patient then lifts his hips while his feet, shoulders, and head maintain contact with the surface. Bridging is often recommended as part of preprosthetic training for patients with transtibial or transfemoral lower extremity amputations. See: illustration

CAUTION!

Bridging should always be performed while the prosthesis is removed.

disulfide bridge

Disulfide bond.

bridge

A fixed support for false teeth which bridges across the gap between surviving natural teeth.

Bridge

An appliance of one or more artificial teeth anchored by crowns on the adjacent teeth.

bridge 

That part of a spectacle frame which forms the main connection between the lenses or rims. The bridge assembly is generally taken to include the pads, if any (British Standard). See spectacles.
flush bridge The bridge of a spectacle frame with zero projection.
inset bridge A spectacle frame so shaped that the bearing surface of the bridge is behind the plane of the lenses.
keyhole bridge Bridge of a spectacle frame with pads, looking like the outline of the upper part of a keyhole.
pad bridge A bridge of a spectacle frame with two pads acting as the resting surface on the nose.
saddle bridge A bridge so shaped as to rest on the nose over a continuous area, but in which the ends of the bearing surface are extended to lie behind the back plane of the front (British Standard).

bridge

(brij)
1. The upper part of the ridge of the nose formed by the nasal bones.
2. One of the threads of protoplasm that appear to pass from one cell to another.
3. Synonym(s): fixed partial denture.
References in periodicals archive ?
An interesting dynamic throughout Bridger's Christian Exegesis is the underlying assumption of the author, and many other evangelical Christians of similar piety, that the Bible is verbally inspired (p.
Bridger is "continuing to operate with Monroe within contract specifications," Bridger chief executive Julio Rios told analysts on a call this week.
The statement, which prosecutors decided not to use as evidence, goes on: "In one earlier conversation I had with Bridger he told me why he was in prison and stated he had run over a young girl called April Jones by accident and killed her, but that the police had not believed him and he had been charged with her murder."
Bridger kidnapped April in Machynlleth, Powys, before murdering her and dumping her body in October 2012.
Bridger claimed he had run over April by accident and did not know what he had done with her body, which has never been found.
Bridger, a father of six, snatched April near her home in Machynlleth, Powys, on October 1 2012.
She added that Bridger has already tried to claim compensation after being attacked by a fellow prisoner (http://www.ibtimes.co.uk/articles/505364/20130911/juvinai-ferreira-admits-attacking-mark-bridger-jail.htm) with a makeshift knife, inside Wakefield Prison in West Yorkshire.
The premeditated attack happened three days after Bridger was allowed to associate with other prisoners.
Bridger kidnapped April before sexually abusing her, murdering her and then disposing of her body last October.
But in Bridger's case, it is believed the concerns for his physical safety outweigh those of his mental stability.
Bridger, who has still not revealed where April's body is, will die in prison after a judge ruled he should face an entire life sentence.
Bridger, a former slaughterhouse worker, was given a whole life sentence by trial judge Mr Justice Griffith Williams after he was convicted by a jury at Mold Crown Court of April's abduction and murder and perverting the course of justice by unlawfully disposing of, destroying or concealing her body.

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