BCR

(redirected from Breakpoint Cluster Region)
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BCR

Breakpoint cluster region. A 5.8-kb DNA segment on chromosome 22q11.23, which, in contrast to the well-studied BCR-ABL fusion protein related to malignant transformation of pluripotent haematopoietic stem cells in CML, encodes a gene product of unknown function, which has serine/threonine kinase activity and is a GTPase-activating protein for p21rac.

In CML there is a reciprocal translocation between chromosome 9q34—a site which contains the human homolog of the Abelson viral oncogene, c-abl—and chromosome 22q1, the location of the breakpoint cluster region; this translocation results in formation of the Philadelphia chromosome, which transcribes a hybrid mRNA, encoding a protein with tyrosine kinase activity.
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References in periodicals archive ?
BCR 3 Isoform (Short isoform): Fusion of PML gene involving intron 6 of breakpoint cluster region (bcr) on chromosome 15 with intron 2 of RAR[alpha] gene on chromosome 17 leads to formation of bcr3 (short isoform) which was detected by conventional double nested PCR.
[6] Human genes: ABL, ABLI, v-abl Abelson murine leukemia viral oncogene homolog 1; BCR, breakpoint cluster region.
This 8 kb region is referred to as the MLL breakpoint cluster region (bcr).
The majority of chromosomal breaks occur in two regions: the major breakpoint cluster region (mbr), where 50-75% of the breaks occur, and the minor breakpoint cluster region (mcr), where 20-40% of the breaks occur [25, 26].
The Myeloid Lymphoid Leukemia (MLL) breakpoint cluster region is located on the long arm of chromosome 11.
Breakpoints detected in the DH segments were unique in each of the 18 patients included in the study and so were the breakpoints in VH segments and the BCL2 locus even in cases where the same breakpoint cluster regions were involved.
Evaluation for the t(14;18) translocation involving either the major or minor breakpoint cluster regions of the bcl-2 gene was performed by polymerase chain reaction on DNA obtained from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded sections using commercially available reagents (Gentra Systems, Minneapolis, Minn; Perkin-Elmer Cetus, Norwalk, Conn).